June 7, 2022

EPISODE 12

There are several paths to the top job. I outline them in this 1.5 minute video.

May 7, 2022

EPISODE 11

This short video offers thoughts on how to break the ice.

April 7, 2022

EPISODE 10

When it comes to offers, high touch matters.

March 7, 2022

EPISODE 9

Hiint: Be careful with expectations.

February 7, 2022

EPISODE 8

Remote work won't put you on the fast track. In this 90 second video, I explain why.

January 14, 2022

To Recruit in This Market, Move Fast or Don’t Bother Trying

The employment market is as hot as it’s been in my lifetime. Candidates are in the driver’s seat. The best of them have many opportunities, and they go off the market quickly. Even a subpar candidate can find a new job in short order.

What’s my biggest challenge in this environment? It’s getting clients to move faster. I spend a lot of time persuading, pushing, and pleading with clients to speed things up.

To be clear, most have stepped up their game. What does that mean? It means they’re providing prompt feedback on candidates, scheduling interviews quickly, and making decisions fast. In short, they are making recruiting their top priority.

Critically, speed does not mean lowering standards. They’re following their established processes and doing everything they usually do to assess candidates. They’re just doing it faster and with a heightened sense of urgency. 

Dithering and pushing things off until tomorrow is a prescription for failure. In this market, every day matters. If you are dragging your feet, you will lose most of your candidates. In the long run, you’ll end up doing twice the work and getting half the results.

Not long ago, I heard an interview with Greg Norman, who said a key to his success has been his compulsion to get things done right away. His mantra is, “Do it now and do it properly.” He can’t stand putting something off to tomorrow that can be done today.

Every hiring manager would benefit from emulating Norman’s approach. When there’s something to be done, do it now. If you’re not willing to put recruiting on the top of your to do list, don’t bother trying.

If you are dragging your feet, you will lose most of your candidates.

January 13, 2022

EPISODE 7

Poor retention means you're always playing catch up.

October 5, 2021

EPISODE 6

Finding people with the right resume is easy. Identifying those with the right intangibles is hard.

August 24, 2021

EPISODE 5

Hint: It's more than money.

August 23, 2021

EPISODE 4

Skimping on referencing is a huge mistake. Here's why.

April 12, 2021

EPISODE 3

Mom’s advice still matters. In this 2 minute video, I explain why the Golden Rule should guide your interactions with candidates.

April 1, 2021

The HR Market is Hot. Thank the Pandemic

During the financial crisis of 2008 and 2009, HR executives took it on the chin. At many companies, HR leaders orchestrated mass layoffs, and then were laid off themselves.

Not this time. These are the glory days for HR. The pandemic has driven demand for HR executives to a level I’ve never seen before.

Why? Because the pandemic forced companies rapidly to reorganize how business gets done. That indispensable work has been led by HR. 

Last year, HR leaders helped companies rapidly transition to working at home. They established a host of new policies to guide the new way of working. They were critical in defining strategies for keeping employees happy and engaged.

Today, with the end of the pandemic in sight, HR is at the center of discussions as companies consider how they will return to the office. The last year has proven that remote workers can be very productive, and many employees like it. Given those facts, should companies require everyone to return to the office, or find a hybrid approach that tries to achieve the best of both worlds? Every company is grappling with these questions, and HR is leading the conversation.

We’re in the early stages of a historic change in how work gets done. The office isn’t going away, but its role is being redefined. I expect it will require several years of experimentation before companies settle into new ways of working.

Until then, expect demand for HR professionals to stay very high.

We’re in the early stages of a historic change in how work gets done.

March 25, 2021

So You Think You Want to Work in a Startup?

Many people think they want to work in a startup. Most of them are wrong.

Here’s a recent candidate story to illustrate the point. My client was a small and fast-growing medical device company with ambitions to quintuple revenues in the coming years. It’s an incredibly exciting business.

On paper, the candidate (I’ll call him Henry) met all the client’s requirements for skills and experience. In addition, he said the right things about wanting to work in a small, high-growth environment. This, Henry said excitedly, was exactly the kind of opportunity he was looking for! 

Until he called me a couple of days after our first conversation. He asked what kind of severance the company was willing to offer.

Severance is a common topic, but it usually comes up much later. Asking at the beginning was a huge red flag. The best candidates ask detailed questions about the business, the challenges it faces, the personalities of the management team, and forecasted growth. Henry’s focus on severance demonstrated he was more interested in security than opportunity.

After a brief follow-up discussion, it became clear he was far too risk-averse for a startup. I politely told him we could not move forward. At a startup, having the right mentality is table stakes. Further discussion would have wasted everyone’s time.

Our culture puts entrepreneurs on a pedestal. Startups are celebrated as glamorous pathways to riches. No one talks about how hard they are. No wonder so many people fantasize about working at startups. They think they would love it.

Most of them are dead wrong. They don’t understand the grinding work, the constant setbacks, and the perpetual risk of failure. When they find out what it really takes, they flee back to the perceived security of a big company.

Startups are incredibly rewarding, but they are not for everyone. If you aspire to work in a small, entrepreneurial company, look inside yourself and make sure you have the stomach for it.

Many people think they want to work in a startup. Most of them are wrong.

February 25, 2021

EPISODE 2

If you want to hire a rockstar, you’re already in trouble. In this 2 minute video I explain why.

Video Series

Short and sweet videos with helpful thoughts and insights on the executive hiring process.

February 8, 2021

Video Series

January 29, 2021

How to Land Your First Board of Directors Seat

Many successful executives aspire to serve on an outside board. Sometimes the motivation comes from within, and other times (especially for active CEOs) their own boards encourage sitting on an outside board for professional development.

Whatever the motivation, how can you land that first board seat? It’s a lot more difficult than it looks, and a brief consideration of the dynamics of a board search explain why.

The board’s nominating committee has formal responsibility for identifying board candidates, but in practice most CEOs direct the selection of new board members with a firm hand. So, consider what the CEO wants.

The CEO has two objectives. First is finding a person who will make a meaningful contribution. What that means depends on the needs of the moment. Usually, the board targets a specific set of skills — for one board seat they may look for a financial expert who can serve on the audit committee, for another they may seek someone with commercial expertise, and so on.

 Second, the CEO wants to avoid recruiting a jerk. Recruiting a disruptive board member is the CEO’s worst nightmare. There are a number of behaviors that can make a board member earn the “jerk” title:

  • Failure to understand the line between governance and management.
  • Pontificating on subjects that are outside of his area of expertise.
  • Antisocial behavior: disrespectful treatment of management and other board members, yelling, and so on.

Caution rules the day. One wrong move and the CEO could end up with a board member who makes life miserable and is almost impossible to get rid of. How does this affect the search for new board members? 

First, trust matters a lot, which translates into a heavy bias toward candidates the CEO knows, or who are known to a trusted colleague. 

Second, first time board members are viewed as particularly risky because they haven’t been in a governance role before. There’s a fear that first-time board members will drift over the line into management.

If you’re seeking your first board of directors seat, the odds are overwhelming that it will come through someone you know. You need to identify opportunities where you’re already known and trusted by some of the key players. It follows that the best strategy for finding a board seat is to talk with all of your closest colleagues. Make sure they know that you are interested in joining a board, and remind them regularly. It will take some time, but this strategy will pay off.

How can you land that first board seat? It’s a lot more difficult than it looks.

January 29, 2021

Predictions for the 2021 Executive Employment Market

My track record of predicting the future is no better than else’s — which is to say, it’s not very good. But that doesn’t stop me from making predictions. Here are mine for the 2021 executive employment market in medical devices.

In short, I think the first quarter will have solid and steady executive hiring, but nothing remarkable. Starting at the beginning of the second quarter, however, I foresee a rapid acceleration of executive hiring as the coronavirus is brought under control and companies dial up spending.

Here’s more detail on my thinking:

To set the table, let’s review 2020. The year began with an employment market that was red-hot. It stayed that way until the coronavirus lockdowns began in mid-March. Since March, the market for executives has remained remarkably solid, albeit not at the heated levels that started the year. 

The solid market, however, masks the uneven effects of the pandemic on device companies. Those with products used to manage the pandemic — diagnostics, PPE, ventilators — have experienced a windfall, and many have increased the pace of executive hiring. On the other extreme, those with products for elective or nonemergency procedures have suffered, with sales riding the ups and downs of coronavirus hospitalizations.

As we begin 2021, I read the overall mood as optimistic, but cautious. Optimistic, because the underlying economy has remained remarkably strong. Cautious, because the last 10 months have taught us that progress against the virus is fraught with uncertainty. The emergence of new, more contagious variants is the latest wildcard.

Only progress against the virus will dial back uncertainty and put optimism in the driver’s seat. Fortunately, that’s about to happen. Within weeks, vaccinations will be happening at a rapid pace. That means the end of the pandemic will be in sight. Optimism will get the upper hand.

When that happens, I expect the hot executive employment market to return with a vengeance. Companies will rapidly increase investment in anticipation of growth. And that means hiring more executive level talent.

Could I be wrong? Of course – I certainly didn’t see a global pandemic coming when we began 2020. But I believe my optimism is rooted in reality. A year from now we’ll know if I’m right.

Starting at the beginning of the second quarter, however, I foresee a rapid acceleration of executive hiring as the coronavirus is brought under control and companies dial up spending.

January 14, 2021

“Ghosting” Candidates? You’re Committing Reputational Suicide

Recently, I called a prospective candidate to pitch a great opportunity. He stopped me when he learned the name of my client and said he would never consider working there. 

Why? He’d interviewed with the company in the past and was treated poorly. After meeting seven people, no one ever contacted him about the status of his candidacy, nor did anyone reply to his messages requesting an update. As my kids would say, he was “ghosted.”

If this were a single data point, I wouldn’t be terribly concerned. No one is perfect, and people and organizations make mistakes. But it wasn’t one data point – it was the third time in six months I’d heard similar stories about the same client. That’s a pattern.

Companies that don’t treat candidates well eventually earn a reputation that repels talent. The damage is difficult to quantify, but it’s meaningful. Over time it will hurt your business, and the worst part is that you will probably never become aware of it.

What’s the root of the problem? It’s not a lack of knowledge — no one needs training to know that a candidate who’s been through seven meetings deserves the courtesy of a clear answer on the status of her candidacy. Heck, that’s basic manners that all of us (hopefully) learned as children.

The root of the problem, I believe, is discomfort in telling people bad news. This is completely normal for anyone who feels empathy. I know this is true because I’ve delivered bad news to candidates every day for more than twenty years, and despite all that practice it’s still my least favorite part of the job. 

Yet I do it, both for professional reasons (I want candidates to feel good about dealing with me and my client) and for personal reasons (it's the right thing to do).

If you’re leading a company, make sure everyone in the organization knows they are expected to treat candidates with respect and courtesy. They must understand they are acting as ambassadors for the company each time they interact with a candidate. 

What’s the goal? Win or lose, candidates should leave feeling good about the way they were treated. When this is done consistently, your company will earn a reputation for treating people well. That kind of positive reputation can make your company a talent magnet.

Companies that don’t treat candidates well eventually earn a reputation that repels talent. 

January 1, 2021

EPISODE 1

The misconception is that recruiting is finding people. There’s so much more involved. In this 2.5 minute video I debunk the myth and explain what’s involved in finding the perfect candidate.

The misconception is that recruiting is finding people. There’s so much more involved. In this 2.5 minute video I debunk the myth and explain what’s involved in finding the perfect candidate.

November 30, 2020

The Curse of the Superstar

When it comes to teams, superstars aren’t all they’re cracked up to be.

Take Kyrie Irving, the immensely talented basketball player who spent two years with my local team, the Boston Celtics. He had a mixed track record with his prior employer, the Cleveland Cavaliers, but Celtics management hoped he would mature and blossom into a leader upon whom they could build a great team.

The plan was a catastrophic failure. To put it politely, Irving did not mature. He was toxic, a sort of anti-leader whose ego, insecurities and poor interpersonal skills made the team worse. When he left, the Celtics improved immediately.

There are countless examples of athletes like Irving who have elite skills but subtract from the success of their teams. You could call it the curse of the superstar.

The same phenomenon exists in business. We’ve all encountered brilliant executives who ruin everything they touch. They destroy teams and performance because they focus only on themselves – their success, their reputation, their ideas. They don’t understand that leading means putting the team first.

Of course, superstars don’t have to be toxic. I’m old enough to remember the great Celtics teams of the early 1980s. They played and won as a team, exploiting each other’s strengths to the fullest. Their best player, Larry Bird, always put the team first. Bird made everyone around him better, and the Celtics were consistent winners.

Now that’s a real superstar.

When it comes to teams, superstars aren’t all they’re cracked up to be.

November 19, 2020

Light at the End of the Tunnel

Businesses have done a great job adapting to a challenging environment this year, and many are thriving. But it’s obvious they’d be doing even more and investing more aggressively if coronavirus weren’t here. It’s created great economic uncertainty.

Now, there’s light at the end of the tunnel. As everyone knows by now, both Pfizer/BioNTech and Moderna have announced exceptionally promising early data from clinical trials of their vaccine candidates. Barring unforeseen negative surprises, it’s likely both will receive emergency authorizations, which will bring the vaccines to patients.

Many other vaccines are in late stage trials, so there are likely to be more successes. With multiple vaccines, we can expect widespread vaccinations in 2021. There’s a strong chance the pandemic will be over by the end of next year.

That’s reason for great optimism as we look forward. With the end of the pandemic in sight, businesses will spend more freely in order to position themselves for the recovery.

We still have to get through the winter, of course, and that may be tough. But there’s light at the end of the tunnel, and that’s great news.

With the end of the pandemic in sight, businesses will spend more freely in order to position themselves for the recovery.

October 30, 2020

Where Should European Startups Place the US Office?

Back in the early days of my career I ran international marketing for a specialty computing company. For a short while, we faced competition from a tough German startup. 

They weren’t a problem for long. The story goes that the founder went to his bank for a loan to support the company’s rapid growth. (Venture capital wasn’t an option, as it was poorly developed in Europe in those days). The banker told the founder he didn’t need money, he just needed to stop growing so fast.

Times have changed, and today Europe boasts a robust startup culture. Each year, it seems a larger percentage of the most interesting new medical device technologies are coming from Europe. All of those companies, if successful, will eventually open a US office.

The reasons are obvious. The US is the largest global market, so success here is a business imperative. But there’s more to it than that — companies also want to tap American investors and often aspire to go public in the US.

But where to open that US office? All of my European clients wrestle with that question. Usually it becomes a question of East versus West.

The West has its attractions. Many Europeans view California through rose colored glasses, and they frequently find the prospect of joining the Bay Area startup scene seductive.

But then reality intrudes. The costs of setting up in California, both for real estate and talent, can be sobering. In addition, there are countless inconveniences that come with establishing an office in a place that’s a 10-hour flight and 9 time zones away.

That’s why most European (and Israeli) startups establish their US offices on the East Coast. Flights are shorter and plentiful, the time zone difference can be easily managed, and there is abundant talent, particularly in the Boston medical device cluster. In fact, although European startups establish offices up and down the East Coast, most of them end up in Boston.

If your European startup is looking to set up a US office, the East Coast is the practical choice.

All of my European clients wrestle with that question. Usually it becomes a question of East versus West.

October 8, 2020

Will Remote Work Go Mainstream After the Pandemic? Don’t Count On It

Thank goodness for the technology that's enabled all of us to do remote work. It’s getting us through the pandemic with a minimal loss in productivity.

In fact, remote work has been successful beyond anyone’s expectations, so much so that many pundits proclaim remote work will become mainstream even when the pandemic is over. They point to a number of advantages, like access to more and better talent.

I’m not buying it. Yes, remote work brings some advantages, but they are far outweighed by the downsides. Consider:

  • Culture. How do you build and maintain culture when employees are not working in the same place? And how do you acculturate new employees, many of whom are working with colleagues they have never met in person? Culture falls apart when colleagues don’t have an opportunity to work together in the real world.
     
  • Relationships. Personal relationships are the grease that makes doing business easier. Relationships formed in the virtual world are qualitatively inferior to those built face-to-face. Remotely connected colleagues have weaker ties to one another. Outside relationships, particularly with new customers, are much harder to develop. It’s tough to build trust on a screen.
     
  • Mentoring. I worry particularly about the development of junior employees. People learn from observing their managers and colleagues, and from the countless informal interactions that happen when people work in the same place. There’s a real risk of stunted career growth for these individuals.

A recent Wall Street Journal article that polled CEOs on remote work highlighted these same concerns. The comment of Arne Sorensen, the CEO of Marriott, was typical: “…remote work clearly works for many things, but I think we’re going to find that being together delivers value in productivity and creativity and relationships that is irreplaceable.” Amen.

Until things get better, we’ll keep doing our best with the tools we’ve got. But once the pandemic is in the rear-view mirror, my bet is that most companies will return to their pre-pandemic routines. 

Yes, remote work brings some advantages, but they are far outweighed by the downsides.

August 20, 2020

Starting a New Job When You Can’t Go to the Office

Months into the COVID-19 pandemic, most employees at medical device companies are still working from home. With recruiting continuing at a healthy pace, newly recruited executives face a challenge they haven’t seen before: How do you come up to speed when you can’t meet colleagues in-person or go to the office? 

In recent weeks, I’ve talked with people I’ve recruited to new jobs during the pandemic to hear how they’ve managed these new challenges. They gave a consistent message on what it takes to successfully transition in this new environment.

First, focus on building relationships. Relationships are the grease that makes business run smoothly, and building them virtually takes a new playbook. My recruits figured out who they needed to meet, and then scheduled time with them for one-on-one video or audio calls. They check in with their new colleagues regularly, since personal interaction in the virtual world never happens by accident.

There’s a silver lining, too. Several people told me they’ve spent more quality time with a broader cross section of colleagues than they would have if they were in the office. That’s because being remote forces new executives to figure out how to manage relationships in a disciplined and programmatic way.

Second, develop a plan to come up to speed on the business and your functional area as quickly as possible. This is challenging without the benefit of the osmosis that happens from immersion in the office.

The executives I spoke with figured out what they needed to know and who could help them learn. Then, they were politely assertive in asking for time from their bosses and colleagues. Remember, remote work is new to hiring managers, too, and they are unlikely to understand what new employees need to be successful. As the new employee, you need to be a squeaky wheel.

The goal, of course, is to build relationships and competence rapidly, and then quickly make a contribution.

Most of us miss face-to-face interaction, but it’s not coming back anytime soon. In the meantime, we have to use the tools we have. The good news is that these tools are incredibly effective when used the right way. Just ask those successful executives who started a new job during the pandemic. 

How do you come up to speed when you can’t meet colleagues in-person or go to the office? 

June 25, 2020

Executive Hiring is Picking Up Steam

Executive hiring is bouncing back. After a brief slowdown immediately following the first US coronavirus lockdowns, companies are ramping up hiring again. That’s great news.

That’s not just my view. Earlier this week, the New York Times featured an article on the recovery in executive hiring, noting a “reawakening in hiring for executive positions.“ (You can find the article here, but access may be limited by the NYT paywall).

To be sure, the snap back in executive hiring is not universal. Industries that have been most affected by the coronavirus crisis (travel, hospitality, and so on) remain dead in the water. However, many others are doing just fine and hiring at a solid pace.

In the medical device industry there is strong progress, although it’s uneven. Companies that make products for any type of critical care are doing fine and hiring executives at a solid pace, while those that depend on elective and non-emergency procedures remain extremely cautious.

Of course, the economic environment remains uncertain, and everyone, even companies that are doing well, is approaching spending (including hiring) with a heightened sense of caution. No one knows how the coronavirus story will unfold or when it will end. Nevertheless, the recent recovery in executive hiring is an encouraging sign that we are headed in the right direction.

Executive hiring is bouncing back.

June 17, 2020

Now is the Best Time in Years to Upgrade Your Team

2020 has brought many challenges, but it’s also created new opportunities. For CEOs, perhaps the biggest silver lining to the current downturn is improved access to talent. In short, the labor market has unfrozen, making this the best time in years to upgrade your executive team.

Everyone who’s hired people in the last five years knows what I’m talking about. The market for talent was overheated, making it more difficult than ever to hire and retain great people.

Now, the tables have turned. Since early March, I’ve seen clients hire great people who would not have considered a change at the start of the year. Candidate pools have suddenly become much stronger.

Why is this the case? More candidates are open to change for a variety of reasons. Some are concerned about the health of their current employers. Others are unhappy they've been forced to take a pay cut. Still others are re-examining their careers and have decided it’s time for something new.

Look at your own executive team. Is this the group you need to lead your company through the coming years? You should be happy with 90% of your executives. If you’re not, there will never be a better time than now to fix it.

Look at your own executive team. Is this the group you need to lead your company through the coming years? 

May 8, 2020

What has COVID-19 Done to the Market for Executive Talent?

Not long ago, the market for medical device executives was red hot. Things have changed a lot in the last 8 weeks. 

Today, parts of the executive market remain strong, but the big picture is mixed. COVID-19 has caused a lot of damage, but its effects aren’t evenly distributed. Some companies continue to thrive and are hiring as fast as ever, while others have cut back dramatically. 

Who continues to hire? Companies that supply products essential for the fight against COVID-19, are thriving, as are those that supply products for emergency procedures, which must continue. In addition, startups that recently raised money and don’t have products in clinical trials are continuing to execute to the plans they developed before the crisis.

Where have things slowed? Companies that rely on non-emergency procedures aren’t hiring. They have seen huge declines in revenue, forcing many to furlough employees, freeze hiring, and make (hopefully) temporary cuts in compensation. 

Another group that’s suffering are startups that need to raise money in the next few months. They suddenly find themselves facing a tough investment climate. They’re cutting back to conserve cash. Some have already gone under.

I see the full range of effects within my own client base. A few continue to hire aggressively. Others have hunkered down until we return to something like normal.

We’ll see what happens in the coming months. Forecasts for the virus and the economy are all over the map. That uncertainty is making it tough for businesses to plan. I don’t expect meaningful improvement until there’s more clarity on where this is going.

Not long ago, the market for medical device executives was red hot. Things have changed a lot in the last 8 weeks. 

October 16, 2019

How to Conduct a Great Interview

Why have so many managers failed to master this fundamental skill? It's simple: they're never taught how to do it. Most companies don't realize their employees need help. On the surface, interviewing looks like a simple skill that doesn't require training. In truth, interviewing is complex, and the consequences of doing it poorly are expensive.

October 16, 2019

The Art of Referencing

There's universal agreement that diet and exercise are the key to good health, but few people have the discipline to change their habits. Similarlt, everyone agrees that references are critically important to the hiring process, yet very few people do them in a seriouss way.

October 16, 2019

Recruiting for the Board of Directors

In today's challenging business environment companies must exploit every competitive advantage. One of the most important is having a skilled and engaged board of directors.

October 16, 2019

A Guide to Identifying, Assessing & Contracting with Executive Search Firms

Hiring them, however, is easier said than done. The best are rare, difficult to find and hard to attract. Competition for them is intense. When companies need to recruit the best executive talent, they retain an executive search consultant. Executive search consultants identify the best candidates, thoughtfully assess their strengths and weaknesses, and artfully persuade them to consider the client's opportunity.

October 26, 2017

Moving Target Syndrome

Everyone knows it’s hard to hit a moving target.

In the world of recruiting, there’s a common problem I call Moving Target Syndrome (let’s call it MTS). In the classic presentation of MTS, the hiring company keeps changing direction. One week they’re looking for candidates with this profile, next week they’re looking for candidates with that profile, and the following week it’s something else.

Naturally, constantly moving the target makes it nearly impossible to hit the bull’s-eye. These recruiting projects tend to go on forever, and frequently end in failure.

How do you know if you have MTS? If you’ve interviewed a long parade of candidates and none of them is right, you probably have it. Things won’t get better unless you make some changes.

Fortunately, the cure is straightforward. Once you recognize the problem, immediately pause the search. Take a few days to re-examine the candidate specification, and eliminate the areas of ambiguity that have been handicapping you. If key players don’t agree, get them in a room and hash it out until you reach consensus.

Then, with a solid candidate specification in hand, get back to work. You’ll discover it’s much easier to find what you want when you know what you’re looking for.

October 18, 2017

Video Conferencing

Videoconference is great for a call with your mom. But it’s not great for judging candidates, or for convincing them to join your company.

I understand why Skype and its peers are increasingly popular for interviewing. Everyone wants to save time, and hiring people is among the most time-consuming of business activities. Why not get more efficient?

That argument would make perfect sense if videoconferencing were as good as a face-to-face meeting, but it’s not. Consider the following:

Poor lighting, cameras, and audio conspire to make everyone look bad.

Most people don’t act like themselves in front of a camera. They’re unnatural and stilted, making it impossible to get a true impression of their personality and personal style.

Just as it’s difficult to judge candidates, it’s difficult for them to judge you. Since one of the major objectives of a first conversation is to sell the candidate, this puts the hiring manager at a strong disadvantage.

A lot of communication — perhaps most — is nonverbal, and it’s very subtle. You don’t get it on video. Yet because videoconferencing provides the illusion of meeting in person, it’s easy to draw conclusions that are dead wrong.

Here’s an example. Recently a client met a candidate over a video call, and came away believing the candidate was mediocre and low energy. Nevertheless, he decided to meet the candidate in person. When he did, he had a completely different opinion. He told me, “I thought he was low-energy, but he’s really energetic and a no-BS guy. I really like him!”

If you like videoconferencing, go ahead and use it. But don’t fool yourself into thinking it’s a substitute for in-person meetings. It can lead you to conclusions that are completely wrong. You can’t make good judgments about someone’s personality from a disembodied head on a video screen.

Put aside the idea that you can cut corners with videoconferencing, and make time for face-to-face meetings. Inevitably, this will involve more time and expense, but it’s well worth it. Not doing so puts you at high risk of hiring the wrong person.

October 5, 2017

Theranos: When Smart People do Stupid Things

The Wall Street Journal continues to report on the saga of Theranos, the former Silicon Valley darling that continues its epic self-immolation.

On March 24, Christopher Weaver and John Carreyrou reported that Theranos is offering investors additional shares in return for an agreement not to sue the company or its founder, the disgraced Elizabeth Holmes. According to the article, Rupert Murdoch didn’t like the deal and decided to sell his stake, for which he paid $125M in 2015, back to the company for $1.

I’d wager that when this is over, Theranos will be worthless. If I’m right, Murdoch got $1 more than his stake was worth.

People will be writing books about this for the next decade.

April 20, 2017

The Job Market Is Hot. What Does That Mean for Employers?

If you’re a hiring manager, you know the job market is as hot as it’s been in years. Competition for talent is intense. That means it’s harder to attract great new employees, and harder to keep the ones you already have.

What does that mean for you? Here are some things to think about:

First, defend what you’ve got. Make sure your top performers know how much they’re valued, and make sure you are doing what you can to keep them happy.

When recruiting, make thoughtful, considered decisions, but don’t dither. These days candidates have lots of opportunities, and delay often means losing a great candidate.

Don’t be pressured into hasty decision making, or cut corners on your hiring process. Hiring decisions made in haste tend to be bad. Instead, accelerate recruiting by putting it at the top of your priority list.

Don’t throw money at the problem. If you have a compensation plan that makes sense, stick to your guns. Overpaying creates all kinds of problems downstream.

Good luck!

April 19, 2017

When Should You Share Personal Information in an Interview?

The candidate had a solid background, but there were some strange transitions on his resume. He’d landed a big overseas posting with a prestigious company, then abruptly left a year later for a lesser position back in the US. It didn’t make sense, and I assumed he was fired.

I asked the candidate what happened, and he gave me a response I wasn’t expecting.

“My only child was diagnosed with terminal brain cancer. He was in his twenties. I had to get back to the States, so I immediately quit and got a job near him. After he passed away, I moved on to a better job in a new city.”

I felt for him and appreciated his honesty. Of course, his explanation put all my concerns about the job transitions to rest.

To be sure, it can be difficult and uncomfortable to share intimate details of one’s life with a stranger. But there are times, like this one, when it is necessary. Sometimes personal considerations — illness, death, divorce, disability — drive decisions about work, and it’s impossible to adequately explain one’s past actions without revealing some personal details.

Think hard, however, before you decide to talk about challenges you are facing in the present. You don’t need to give prospective employers reason to question your ability to devote your full time and attention to the job.

April 13, 2017

It's all About People

Back in September, I attended MassDevice DeviceTalks Boston. As usual, the MassDevice folks put on a terrific program.

One of the featured speakers was Jeff Burbank, Founder and CEO of NxStage Medical, the dialysis company. In a candid interview, he talked about the company’s growth, and the challenges he faced along the way.

In one particularly enlightening exchange, Burbank underlined the challenge of identifying and recruiting the right people. Here are his remarks (many thanks to Brad Perriello of MassDevice for the transcript):

MassDevice:

What […] were some of the things you thought about to create a great company? What were some of the ingredients you thought that that cake needed?

Jeff Burbank:
People, people, people. I think everybody likes to make it about technology, markets, those things. It’s not, […] it’s about putting together the best team you can possibly put together because people solve problems. People find markets. People make production work. It’s all about people and creating an environment where successful people, talented people can be successful. They’ll push you and they’ll drive you and sometimes even drive you nuts, but it’s all about people.

MassDevice:
Do you remember some of the mistakes you made early on?

Jeff Burbank:
How long is this? […] Yeah, it takes you a while to figure out how to identify and motivate good people. Getting through an interview process and understanding are they real? Can they get things done? You can’t hide in a startup or a fast-growing company…

As Burbank spoke, I noted many of his fellow CEOs in the audience nodding in agreement. Like Burbank, they’ve lived with good and bad hires, and struggled to learn how to tell the difference.

Identifying the right people is hard. I think it’s the hardest thing any manager does. But nothing is more important. You get better at it with experience.

In Burbank’s words, “People, people, people.”

April 4, 2017

Interviewing for the CEO Job? Think Like an Owner

I’m recruiting a CEO for a medical device company that’s owned by a private equity firm. Last week, I was talking with one of the partners about his phone call with one of the candidates.

He said, “The thing that distinguished this guy were his questions. They showed he thinks like an owner. It’s incredibly powerful. In fact, you should tell candidates to do that because it really sets them apart.”

Now I’ve told you.

October 19, 2016

How not to Network

Networking is easy — except when you make it hard on yourself.

Last month I ran into a medical device executive I’ve known for a couple of years (let’s call him Peter). He’s considering a job change and a couple months earlier asked me for a few referrals.

“How’d it got with those introductions?” I asked.

“I never got in touch with them,” he replied. “I’ve been so busy.”

I was mildly annoyed. He’d asked for introductions with a sense of urgency. I guess it wasn’t that urgent after all.

Job seekers, and everyone else who has occasion to ask for a professional introduction, take note.

When you ask for a referral, you are asking someone to take time and expend relationship equity with the individuals you want to meet. It’s not a big deal, but it’s not trivial, either.

Asking for a referral and then not following up is a cardinal sin. You’ve wasted the time and goodwill of the person from whom you requested the favor. You can only make that mistake once, because you won’t get help a second time.

I’m sure Peter will be back with another request. But next time, I won’t be nearly so eager to help.

October 13, 2016

Is this the Way to Remove Bias in Hiring?

Business Insider reported on a presentation by Kennedy School Professor Iris Bohnet at the Financial Times Women at the Top Conference in London. She spoke about decreasing bias in hiring.

Bias is a real problem, and not just for candidates who are disadvantaged by it. Bias is a problem for employers, who can end up passing on superior candidates when unrecognized bias leads to selection of the wrong person. That hurts the bottom line.

The article quotes Bohnet:

“Panel interviews (when a candidate sits across from a line of interviewers) need to stop,” said Prof. Bohnet, who is also the author of “What Works: Gender Equality By Design.”

“Why? — These three people will not come up with independent assessments of the candidate. They will influence each other, so you are wasting that person’s time. You should do separate interviews to form your own opinion.

“You should in every interview make sure you ask the same questions, in the same order, and rank each answer.”

I can get behind her recommendation to end panel interviewing. I’ve never liked them anyway, but for an entirely different reason — they tend to feel like an inquisition, and result in conversations that don’t reveal any useful information about the candidate.

I couldn’t disagree more with her suggestion that every interviewer ask the same questions in the same order. If that tactic eliminates bias, it will do so at the cost of making the interview pointless. Asking a list of set questions turns the interviewer into an automaton, and destroys the opportunity to engage the candidate in spontaneous discussion, which is where the most valuable information is always uncovered.

That’s not to mention the fact that this process will repel candidates. Making prospective employees sit through a stream of identical interviews will drive them crazy, and give the impression that the employer is rigid and bureaucratic. Who wants to work for a company like that?

Eliminating bias is the right thing to do, both for people and for the bottom line. But this isn’t the way to do it.

September 20, 2016

Newsflash: Soft Skills in Short Supply

The Wall Street Journal published an interesting piece on the challenge of finding job candidates who have soft skills. The author, Kate Davidson, writes:

“Companies across the U.S. say it is becoming increasingly difficult to find applicants who can communicate clearly, take initiative, problem-solve and get along with co-workers…

“In a Wall Street Journal survey of nearly 900 executives last year, 92% said soft skills were equally important or more important than technical skills. But 89% said they have a very or somewhat difficult time finding people with the requisite attributes.”

That’s not really news, and comes as no surprise to those of us who hire people for a living.

Since the dawn of time, soft skills have been the difference between great employees and mediocre ones. The world is filled with individuals who have great technical skill, but accomplish little because they communicate poorly, can’t work well with others, are crippled by a poor self-image, or any of dozens of other deficits in soft skills.

Is the problem worse today than it has been in the past? I don’t think so, although the tight labor market has made people with excellent soft skills more difficult to attract and retain.

I suspect there may be something else going on. Maybe it’s the employers who have a problem because they are becoming less effective at identifying soft skills in candidates.

Think about it. As companies increasingly rely on automated screening of candidates, hiring managers (and especially HR professionals) spend more time with computer screens and less with people. As a result, they don’t see real human candidates enough to become skilled in assessing them. They just aren’t putting in the time to get good at it.

That would be truly ironic — employers complaining they can’t find soft skills because their own soft skills aren’t up to the task.

September 8, 2016

Landing the First CEO Job

Many up and coming leaders aspire to become a CEO. Landing that first CEO job is tough, and I'm often asked for advice on how to do it. It's a tricky question. In my own work on CEO searches, it's unusual to see companies willing take a risk on someone who's never held the top job. Most boards of directors want a low risk candidate who has already been a CEO. So how does an aspiring CEO get the first shot at the corner office? I've seen it happen in the following ways:

  • They get promoted from within. This is by far the most common path. A CEO resigns or is fired, and the company suddenly faces a vacancy. By promoting an internal candidate, the company saves time and money, but more importantly it gets a known quantity who already knows the business.
  • They get hired by a trusted colleague. Another common path is winning the first CEO job through a trusted colleague. Maybe it's an investor who worked with the candidate at a prior business, or a former boss who's now sitting on the board of the hiring company. Whatever the case, there's a pre-existing relationship, and a lot of trust, that enables the hiring company to make the necessary leap of faith.
  • They make their own job. Entrepreneurially-minded people can appoint themselves CEO by starting their own company. Many well-known entrepreneurs — think of Steve Jobs or Bill Gates — became CEOs of their own companies at times when they would never have been considered for the job anywhere else.
  • They join a fixer-upper. A fourth path is through a troubled company where the board is having difficulty filling the CEO job. After they beat their heads against the wall trying to recruit a seasoned executive, they decide to give a first timer a shot. This can be a no-lose deal for the first time CEO. Turning around a bad situation will make her a hero, but failing won’t be a black mark on her record because the company was in deep trouble before she arrived.
What can you do to maximize your chances of becoming a CEO? I suggest a few simple steps:
  • Do great work. Without it, nothing else matters.
  • Tell people — both within your employer and outside — where you'd like to take your career. If they don't know about your aspirations, they may never think of you when opportunities arise.
  • Develop a mentor — or several mentors — who can give you candid advice. The learning curve is too steep to do it all yourself, so you must learn from the experience of people who came before you.
  • Finally, project confidence. If you don't believe you can handle the top job, no one else will, either.
Good luck!

September 8, 2016

Landing the First CEO Job

Many up and coming leaders aspire to become a CEO. Landing that first CEO job is tough, and I'm often asked for advice on how to do it. It's a tricky question. In my own work on CEO searches, it's unusual to see companies willing take a risk on someone who's never held the top job. Most boards of directors want a low risk candidate who has already been a CEO. So how does an aspiring CEO get the first shot at the corner office? I've seen it happen in the following ways:

  • They get promoted from within. This is by far the most common path. A CEO resigns or is fired, and the company suddenly faces a vacancy. By promoting an internal candidate, the company saves time and money, but more importantly it gets a known quantity who already knows the business.
  • They get hired by a trusted colleague. Another common path is winning the first CEO job through a trusted colleague. Maybe it's an investor who worked with the candidate at a prior business, or a former boss who's now sitting on the board of the hiring company. Whatever the case, there's a pre-existing relationship, and a lot of trust, that enables the hiring company to make the necessary leap of faith.
  • They make their own job. Entrepreneurially-minded people can appoint themselves CEO by starting their own company. Many well-known entrepreneurs — think of Steve Jobs or Bill Gates — became CEOs of their own companies at times when they would never have been considered for the job anywhere else.
  • They join a fixer-upper. A fourth path is through a troubled company where the board is having difficulty filling the CEO job. After they beat their heads against the wall trying to recruit a seasoned executive, they decide to give a first timer a shot. This can be a no-lose deal for the first time CEO. Turning around a bad situation will make her a hero, but failing won’t be a black mark on her record because the company was in deep trouble before she arrived.
What can you do to maximize your chances of becoming a CEO? I suggest a few simple steps:
  • Do great work. Without it, nothing else matters.
  • Tell people — both within your employer and outside — where you'd like to take your career. If they don't know about your aspirations, they may never think of you when opportunities arise.
  • Develop a mentor — or several mentors — who can give you candid advice. The learning curve is too steep to do it all yourself, so you must learn from the experience of people who came before you.
  • Finally, project confidence. If you don't believe you can handle the top job, no one else will, either.
Good luck!

September 8, 2016

Landing the First CEO Job

Many up and coming leaders aspire to become a CEO. Landing that first CEO job is tough, and I'm often asked for advice on how to do it. It's a tricky question. In my own work on CEO searches, it's unusual to see companies willing take a risk on someone who's never held the top job. Most boards of directors want a low risk candidate who has already been a CEO. So how does an aspiring CEO get the first shot at the corner office? I've seen it happen in the following ways:

  • They get promoted from within. This is by far the most common path. A CEO resigns or is fired, and the company suddenly faces a vacancy. By promoting an internal candidate, the company saves time and money, but more importantly it gets a known quantity who already knows the business.
  • They get hired by a trusted colleague. Another common path is winning the first CEO job through a trusted colleague. Maybe it's an investor who worked with the candidate at a prior business, or a former boss who's now sitting on the board of the hiring company. Whatever the case, there's a pre-existing relationship, and a lot of trust, that enables the hiring company to make the necessary leap of faith.
  • They make their own job. Entrepreneurially-minded people can appoint themselves CEO by starting their own company. Many well-known entrepreneurs — think of Steve Jobs or Bill Gates — became CEOs of their own companies at times when they would never have been considered for the job anywhere else.
  • They join a fixer-upper. A fourth path is through a troubled company where the board is having difficulty filling the CEO job. After they beat their heads against the wall trying to recruit a seasoned executive, they decide to give a first timer a shot. This can be a no-lose deal for the first time CEO. Turning around a bad situation will make her a hero, but failing won’t be a black mark on her record because the company was in deep trouble before she arrived.
What can you do to maximize your chances of becoming a CEO? I suggest a few simple steps:
  • Do great work. Without it, nothing else matters.
  • Tell people — both within your employer and outside — where you'd like to take your career. If they don't know about your aspirations, they may never think of you when opportunities arise.
  • Develop a mentor — or several mentors — who can give you candid advice. The learning curve is too steep to do it all yourself, so you must learn from the experience of people who came before you.
  • Finally, project confidence. If you don't believe you can handle the top job, no one else will, either.
Good luck!

September 8, 2016

Landing the First CEO Job

Many up and coming leaders aspire to become a CEO. Landing that first CEO job is tough, and I'm often asked for advice on how to do it. It's a tricky question. In my own work on CEO searches, it's unusual to see companies willing take a risk on someone who's never held the top job. Most boards of directors want a low risk candidate who has already been a CEO. So how does an aspiring CEO get the first shot at the corner office? I've seen it happen in the following ways:

  • They get promoted from within. This is by far the most common path. A CEO resigns or is fired, and the company suddenly faces a vacancy. By promoting an internal candidate, the company saves time and money, but more importantly it gets a known quantity who already knows the business.
  • They get hired by a trusted colleague. Another common path is winning the first CEO job through a trusted colleague. Maybe it's an investor who worked with the candidate at a prior business, or a former boss who's now sitting on the board of the hiring company. Whatever the case, there's a pre-existing relationship, and a lot of trust, that enables the hiring company to make the necessary leap of faith.
  • They make their own job. Entrepreneurially-minded people can appoint themselves CEO by starting their own company. Many well-known entrepreneurs — think of Steve Jobs or Bill Gates — became CEOs of their own companies at times when they would never have been considered for the job anywhere else.
  • They join a fixer-upper. A fourth path is through a troubled company where the board is having difficulty filling the CEO job. After they beat their heads against the wall trying to recruit a seasoned executive, they decide to give a first timer a shot. This can be a no-lose deal for the first time CEO. Turning around a bad situation will make her a hero, but failing won’t be a black mark on her record because the company was in deep trouble before she arrived.
What can you do to maximize your chances of becoming a CEO? I suggest a few simple steps:
  • Do great work. Without it, nothing else matters.
  • Tell people — both within your employer and outside — where you'd like to take your career. If they don't know about your aspirations, they may never think of you when opportunities arise.
  • Develop a mentor — or several mentors — who can give you candid advice. The learning curve is too steep to do it all yourself, so you must learn from the experience of people who came before you.
  • Finally, project confidence. If you don't believe you can handle the top job, no one else will, either.
Good luck!

September 8, 2016

Landing the First CEO Job

Many up and coming leaders aspire to become a CEO. Landing that first CEO job is tough, and I'm often asked for advice on how to do it. It's a tricky question. In my own work on CEO searches, it's unusual to see companies willing take a risk on someone who's never held the top job. Most boards of directors want a low risk candidate who has already been a CEO. So how does an aspiring CEO get the first shot at the corner office? I've seen it happen in the following ways:

  • They get promoted from within. This is by far the most common path. A CEO resigns or is fired, and the company suddenly faces a vacancy. By promoting an internal candidate, the company saves time and money, but more importantly it gets a known quantity who already knows the business.
  • They get hired by a trusted colleague. Another common path is winning the first CEO job through a trusted colleague. Maybe it's an investor who worked with the candidate at a prior business, or a former boss who's now sitting on the board of the hiring company. Whatever the case, there's a pre-existing relationship, and a lot of trust, that enables the hiring company to make the necessary leap of faith.
  • They make their own job. Entrepreneurially-minded people can appoint themselves CEO by starting their own company. Many well-known entrepreneurs — think of Steve Jobs or Bill Gates — became CEOs of their own companies at times when they would never have been considered for the job anywhere else.
  • They join a fixer-upper. A fourth path is through a troubled company where the board is having difficulty filling the CEO job. After they beat their heads against the wall trying to recruit a seasoned executive, they decide to give a first timer a shot. This can be a no-lose deal for the first time CEO. Turning around a bad situation will make her a hero, but failing won’t be a black mark on her record because the company was in deep trouble before she arrived.
What can you do to maximize your chances of becoming a CEO? I suggest a few simple steps:
  • Do great work. Without it, nothing else matters.
  • Tell people — both within your employer and outside — where you'd like to take your career. If they don't know about your aspirations, they may never think of you when opportunities arise.
  • Develop a mentor — or several mentors — who can give you candid advice. The learning curve is too steep to do it all yourself, so you must learn from the experience of people who came before you.
  • Finally, project confidence. If you don't believe you can handle the top job, no one else will, either.
Good luck!

September 8, 2016

Landing the First CEO Job

Many up and coming leaders aspire to become a CEO. Landing that first CEO job is tough, and I'm often asked for advice on how to do it. It's a tricky question. In my own work on CEO searches, it's unusual to see companies willing take a risk on someone who's never held the top job. Most boards of directors want a low risk candidate who has already been a CEO. So how does an aspiring CEO get the first shot at the corner office? I've seen it happen in the following ways:

  • They get promoted from within. This is by far the most common path. A CEO resigns or is fired, and the company suddenly faces a vacancy. By promoting an internal candidate, the company saves time and money, but more importantly it gets a known quantity who already knows the business.
  • They get hired by a trusted colleague. Another common path is winning the first CEO job through a trusted colleague. Maybe it's an investor who worked with the candidate at a prior business, or a former boss who's now sitting on the board of the hiring company. Whatever the case, there's a pre-existing relationship, and a lot of trust, that enables the hiring company to make the necessary leap of faith.
  • They make their own job. Entrepreneurially-minded people can appoint themselves CEO by starting their own company. Many well-known entrepreneurs — think of Steve Jobs or Bill Gates — became CEOs of their own companies at times when they would never have been considered for the job anywhere else.
  • They join a fixer-upper. A fourth path is through a troubled company where the board is having difficulty filling the CEO job. After they beat their heads against the wall trying to recruit a seasoned executive, they decide to give a first timer a shot. This can be a no-lose deal for the first time CEO. Turning around a bad situation will make her a hero, but failing won’t be a black mark on her record because the company was in deep trouble before she arrived.
What can you do to maximize your chances of becoming a CEO? I suggest a few simple steps:
  • Do great work. Without it, nothing else matters.
  • Tell people — both within your employer and outside — where you'd like to take your career. If they don't know about your aspirations, they may never think of you when opportunities arise.
  • Develop a mentor — or several mentors — who can give you candid advice. The learning curve is too steep to do it all yourself, so you must learn from the experience of people who came before you.
  • Finally, project confidence. If you don't believe you can handle the top job, no one else will, either.
Good luck!

September 8, 2016

Landing the First CEO Job

Many up and coming leaders aspire to become a CEO. Landing that first CEO job is tough, and I'm often asked for advice on how to do it. It's a tricky question. In my own work on CEO searches, it's unusual to see companies willing take a risk on someone who's never held the top job. Most boards of directors want a low risk candidate who has already been a CEO. So how does an aspiring CEO get the first shot at the corner office? I've seen it happen in the following ways:

  • They get promoted from within. This is by far the most common path. A CEO resigns or is fired, and the company suddenly faces a vacancy. By promoting an internal candidate, the company saves time and money, but more importantly it gets a known quantity who already knows the business.
  • They get hired by a trusted colleague. Another common path is winning the first CEO job through a trusted colleague. Maybe it's an investor who worked with the candidate at a prior business, or a former boss who's now sitting on the board of the hiring company. Whatever the case, there's a pre-existing relationship, and a lot of trust, that enables the hiring company to make the necessary leap of faith.
  • They make their own job. Entrepreneurially-minded people can appoint themselves CEO by starting their own company. Many well-known entrepreneurs — think of Steve Jobs or Bill Gates — became CEOs of their own companies at times when they would never have been considered for the job anywhere else.
  • They join a fixer-upper. A fourth path is through a troubled company where the board is having difficulty filling the CEO job. After they beat their heads against the wall trying to recruit a seasoned executive, they decide to give a first timer a shot. This can be a no-lose deal for the first time CEO. Turning around a bad situation will make her a hero, but failing won’t be a black mark on her record because the company was in deep trouble before she arrived.
What can you do to maximize your chances of becoming a CEO? I suggest a few simple steps:
  • Do great work. Without it, nothing else matters.
  • Tell people — both within your employer and outside — where you'd like to take your career. If they don't know about your aspirations, they may never think of you when opportunities arise.
  • Develop a mentor — or several mentors — who can give you candid advice. The learning curve is too steep to do it all yourself, so you must learn from the experience of people who came before you.
  • Finally, project confidence. If you don't believe you can handle the top job, no one else will, either.
Good luck!

September 8, 2016

Landing the First CEO Job

Many up and coming leaders aspire to become a CEO. Landing that first CEO job is tough, and I'm often asked for advice on how to do it. It's a tricky question. In my own work on CEO searches, it's unusual to see companies willing take a risk on someone who's never held the top job. Most boards of directors want a low risk candidate who has already been a CEO. So how does an aspiring CEO get the first shot at the corner office? I've seen it happen in the following ways:

  • They get promoted from within. This is by far the most common path. A CEO resigns or is fired, and the company suddenly faces a vacancy. By promoting an internal candidate, the company saves time and money, but more importantly it gets a known quantity who already knows the business.
  • They get hired by a trusted colleague. Another common path is winning the first CEO job through a trusted colleague. Maybe it's an investor who worked with the candidate at a prior business, or a former boss who's now sitting on the board of the hiring company. Whatever the case, there's a pre-existing relationship, and a lot of trust, that enables the hiring company to make the necessary leap of faith.
  • They make their own job. Entrepreneurially-minded people can appoint themselves CEO by starting their own company. Many well-known entrepreneurs — think of Steve Jobs or Bill Gates — became CEOs of their own companies at times when they would never have been considered for the job anywhere else.
  • They join a fixer-upper. A fourth path is through a troubled company where the board is having difficulty filling the CEO job. After they beat their heads against the wall trying to recruit a seasoned executive, they decide to give a first timer a shot. This can be a no-lose deal for the first time CEO. Turning around a bad situation will make her a hero, but failing won’t be a black mark on her record because the company was in deep trouble before she arrived.
What can you do to maximize your chances of becoming a CEO? I suggest a few simple steps:
  • Do great work. Without it, nothing else matters.
  • Tell people — both within your employer and outside — where you'd like to take your career. If they don't know about your aspirations, they may never think of you when opportunities arise.
  • Develop a mentor — or several mentors — who can give you candid advice. The learning curve is too steep to do it all yourself, so you must learn from the experience of people who came before you.
  • Finally, project confidence. If you don't believe you can handle the top job, no one else will, either.
Good luck!

September 8, 2016

Landing the First CEO Job

Many up and coming leaders aspire to become a CEO. Landing that first CEO job is tough, and I'm often asked for advice on how to do it. It's a tricky question. In my own work on CEO searches, it's unusual to see companies willing take a risk on someone who's never held the top job. Most boards of directors want a low risk candidate who has already been a CEO. So how does an aspiring CEO get the first shot at the corner office? I've seen it happen in the following ways:

  • They get promoted from within. This is by far the most common path. A CEO resigns or is fired, and the company suddenly faces a vacancy. By promoting an internal candidate, the company saves time and money, but more importantly it gets a known quantity who already knows the business.
  • They get hired by a trusted colleague. Another common path is winning the first CEO job through a trusted colleague. Maybe it's an investor who worked with the candidate at a prior business, or a former boss who's now sitting on the board of the hiring company. Whatever the case, there's a pre-existing relationship, and a lot of trust, that enables the hiring company to make the necessary leap of faith.
  • They make their own job. Entrepreneurially-minded people can appoint themselves CEO by starting their own company. Many well-known entrepreneurs — think of Steve Jobs or Bill Gates — became CEOs of their own companies at times when they would never have been considered for the job anywhere else.
  • They join a fixer-upper. A fourth path is through a troubled company where the board is having difficulty filling the CEO job. After they beat their heads against the wall trying to recruit a seasoned executive, they decide to give a first timer a shot. This can be a no-lose deal for the first time CEO. Turning around a bad situation will make her a hero, but failing won’t be a black mark on her record because the company was in deep trouble before she arrived.
What can you do to maximize your chances of becoming a CEO? I suggest a few simple steps:
  • Do great work. Without it, nothing else matters.
  • Tell people — both within your employer and outside — where you'd like to take your career. If they don't know about your aspirations, they may never think of you when opportunities arise.
  • Develop a mentor — or several mentors — who can give you candid advice. The learning curve is too steep to do it all yourself, so you must learn from the experience of people who came before you.
  • Finally, project confidence. If you don't believe you can handle the top job, no one else will, either.
Good luck!

September 8, 2016

Landing the First CEO Job

Many up and coming leaders aspire to become a CEO. Landing that first CEO job is tough, and I'm often asked for advice on how to do it. It's a tricky question. In my own work on CEO searches, it's unusual to see companies willing take a risk on someone who's never held the top job. Most boards of directors want a low risk candidate who has already been a CEO. So how does an aspiring CEO get the first shot at the corner office? I've seen it happen in the following ways:

  • They get promoted from within. This is by far the most common path. A CEO resigns or is fired, and the company suddenly faces a vacancy. By promoting an internal candidate, the company saves time and money, but more importantly it gets a known quantity who already knows the business.
  • They get hired by a trusted colleague. Another common path is winning the first CEO job through a trusted colleague. Maybe it's an investor who worked with the candidate at a prior business, or a former boss who's now sitting on the board of the hiring company. Whatever the case, there's a pre-existing relationship, and a lot of trust, that enables the hiring company to make the necessary leap of faith.
  • They make their own job. Entrepreneurially-minded people can appoint themselves CEO by starting their own company. Many well-known entrepreneurs — think of Steve Jobs or Bill Gates — became CEOs of their own companies at times when they would never have been considered for the job anywhere else.
  • They join a fixer-upper. A fourth path is through a troubled company where the board is having difficulty filling the CEO job. After they beat their heads against the wall trying to recruit a seasoned executive, they decide to give a first timer a shot. This can be a no-lose deal for the first time CEO. Turning around a bad situation will make her a hero, but failing won’t be a black mark on her record because the company was in deep trouble before she arrived.
What can you do to maximize your chances of becoming a CEO? I suggest a few simple steps:
  • Do great work. Without it, nothing else matters.
  • Tell people — both within your employer and outside — where you'd like to take your career. If they don't know about your aspirations, they may never think of you when opportunities arise.
  • Develop a mentor — or several mentors — who can give you candid advice. The learning curve is too steep to do it all yourself, so you must learn from the experience of people who came before you.
  • Finally, project confidence. If you don't believe you can handle the top job, no one else will, either.
Good luck!

September 8, 2016

Landing the First CEO Job

Many up and coming leaders aspire to become a CEO. Landing that first CEO job is tough, and I'm often asked for advice on how to do it. It's a tricky question. In my own work on CEO searches, it's unusual to see companies willing take a risk on someone who's never held the top job. Most boards of directors want a low risk candidate who has already been a CEO. So how does an aspiring CEO get the first shot at the corner office? I've seen it happen in the following ways:

  • They get promoted from within. This is by far the most common path. A CEO resigns or is fired, and the company suddenly faces a vacancy. By promoting an internal candidate, the company saves time and money, but more importantly it gets a known quantity who already knows the business.
  • They get hired by a trusted colleague. Another common path is winning the first CEO job through a trusted colleague. Maybe it's an investor who worked with the candidate at a prior business, or a former boss who's now sitting on the board of the hiring company. Whatever the case, there's a pre-existing relationship, and a lot of trust, that enables the hiring company to make the necessary leap of faith.
  • They make their own job. Entrepreneurially-minded people can appoint themselves CEO by starting their own company. Many well-known entrepreneurs — think of Steve Jobs or Bill Gates — became CEOs of their own companies at times when they would never have been considered for the job anywhere else.
  • They join a fixer-upper. A fourth path is through a troubled company where the board is having difficulty filling the CEO job. After they beat their heads against the wall trying to recruit a seasoned executive, they decide to give a first timer a shot. This can be a no-lose deal for the first time CEO. Turning around a bad situation will make her a hero, but failing won’t be a black mark on her record because the company was in deep trouble before she arrived.
What can you do to maximize your chances of becoming a CEO? I suggest a few simple steps:
  • Do great work. Without it, nothing else matters.
  • Tell people — both within your employer and outside — where you'd like to take your career. If they don't know about your aspirations, they may never think of you when opportunities arise.
  • Develop a mentor — or several mentors — who can give you candid advice. The learning curve is too steep to do it all yourself, so you must learn from the experience of people who came before you.
  • Finally, project confidence. If you don't believe you can handle the top job, no one else will, either.
Good luck!

September 8, 2016

Landing the First CEO Job

Many up and coming leaders aspire to become a CEO. Landing that first CEO job is tough, and I'm often asked for advice on how to do it. It's a tricky question. In my own work on CEO searches, it's unusual to see companies willing take a risk on someone who's never held the top job. Most boards of directors want a low risk candidate who has already been a CEO. So how does an aspiring CEO get the first shot at the corner office? I've seen it happen in the following ways:

  • They get promoted from within. This is by far the most common path. A CEO resigns or is fired, and the company suddenly faces a vacancy. By promoting an internal candidate, the company saves time and money, but more importantly it gets a known quantity who already knows the business.
  • They get hired by a trusted colleague. Another common path is winning the first CEO job through a trusted colleague. Maybe it's an investor who worked with the candidate at a prior business, or a former boss who's now sitting on the board of the hiring company. Whatever the case, there's a pre-existing relationship, and a lot of trust, that enables the hiring company to make the necessary leap of faith.
  • They make their own job. Entrepreneurially-minded people can appoint themselves CEO by starting their own company. Many well-known entrepreneurs — think of Steve Jobs or Bill Gates — became CEOs of their own companies at times when they would never have been considered for the job anywhere else.
  • They join a fixer-upper. A fourth path is through a troubled company where the board is having difficulty filling the CEO job. After they beat their heads against the wall trying to recruit a seasoned executive, they decide to give a first timer a shot. This can be a no-lose deal for the first time CEO. Turning around a bad situation will make her a hero, but failing won’t be a black mark on her record because the company was in deep trouble before she arrived.
What can you do to maximize your chances of becoming a CEO? I suggest a few simple steps:
  • Do great work. Without it, nothing else matters.
  • Tell people — both within your employer and outside — where you'd like to take your career. If they don't know about your aspirations, they may never think of you when opportunities arise.
  • Develop a mentor — or several mentors — who can give you candid advice. The learning curve is too steep to do it all yourself, so you must learn from the experience of people who came before you.
  • Finally, project confidence. If you don't believe you can handle the top job, no one else will, either.
Good luck!

September 8, 2016

Landing the First CEO Job

Many up and coming leaders aspire to become a CEO. Landing that first CEO job is tough, and I'm often asked for advice on how to do it. It's a tricky question. In my own work on CEO searches, it's unusual to see companies willing take a risk on someone who's never held the top job. Most boards of directors want a low risk candidate who has already been a CEO. So how does an aspiring CEO get the first shot at the corner office? I've seen it happen in the following ways:

  • They get promoted from within. This is by far the most common path. A CEO resigns or is fired, and the company suddenly faces a vacancy. By promoting an internal candidate, the company saves time and money, but more importantly it gets a known quantity who already knows the business.
  • They get hired by a trusted colleague. Another common path is winning the first CEO job through a trusted colleague. Maybe it's an investor who worked with the candidate at a prior business, or a former boss who's now sitting on the board of the hiring company. Whatever the case, there's a pre-existing relationship, and a lot of trust, that enables the hiring company to make the necessary leap of faith.
  • They make their own job. Entrepreneurially-minded people can appoint themselves CEO by starting their own company. Many well-known entrepreneurs — think of Steve Jobs or Bill Gates — became CEOs of their own companies at times when they would never have been considered for the job anywhere else.
  • They join a fixer-upper. A fourth path is through a troubled company where the board is having difficulty filling the CEO job. After they beat their heads against the wall trying to recruit a seasoned executive, they decide to give a first timer a shot. This can be a no-lose deal for the first time CEO. Turning around a bad situation will make her a hero, but failing won’t be a black mark on her record because the company was in deep trouble before she arrived.
What can you do to maximize your chances of becoming a CEO? I suggest a few simple steps:
  • Do great work. Without it, nothing else matters.
  • Tell people — both within your employer and outside — where you'd like to take your career. If they don't know about your aspirations, they may never think of you when opportunities arise.
  • Develop a mentor — or several mentors — who can give you candid advice. The learning curve is too steep to do it all yourself, so you must learn from the experience of people who came before you.
  • Finally, project confidence. If you don't believe you can handle the top job, no one else will, either.
Good luck!

September 8, 2016

Landing the First CEO Job

Many up and coming leaders aspire to become a CEO. Landing that first CEO job is tough, and I'm often asked for advice on how to do it. It's a tricky question. In my own work on CEO searches, it's unusual to see companies willing take a risk on someone who's never held the top job. Most boards of directors want a low risk candidate who has already been a CEO. So how does an aspiring CEO get the first shot at the corner office? I've seen it happen in the following ways:

  • They get promoted from within. This is by far the most common path. A CEO resigns or is fired, and the company suddenly faces a vacancy. By promoting an internal candidate, the company saves time and money, but more importantly it gets a known quantity who already knows the business.
  • They get hired by a trusted colleague. Another common path is winning the first CEO job through a trusted colleague. Maybe it's an investor who worked with the candidate at a prior business, or a former boss who's now sitting on the board of the hiring company. Whatever the case, there's a pre-existing relationship, and a lot of trust, that enables the hiring company to make the necessary leap of faith.
  • They make their own job. Entrepreneurially-minded people can appoint themselves CEO by starting their own company. Many well-known entrepreneurs — think of Steve Jobs or Bill Gates — became CEOs of their own companies at times when they would never have been considered for the job anywhere else.
  • They join a fixer-upper. A fourth path is through a troubled company where the board is having difficulty filling the CEO job. After they beat their heads against the wall trying to recruit a seasoned executive, they decide to give a first timer a shot. This can be a no-lose deal for the first time CEO. Turning around a bad situation will make her a hero, but failing won’t be a black mark on her record because the company was in deep trouble before she arrived.
What can you do to maximize your chances of becoming a CEO? I suggest a few simple steps:
  • Do great work. Without it, nothing else matters.
  • Tell people — both within your employer and outside — where you'd like to take your career. If they don't know about your aspirations, they may never think of you when opportunities arise.
  • Develop a mentor — or several mentors — who can give you candid advice. The learning curve is too steep to do it all yourself, so you must learn from the experience of people who came before you.
  • Finally, project confidence. If you don't believe you can handle the top job, no one else will, either.
Good luck!

September 8, 2016

Landing the First CEO Job

Many up and coming leaders aspire to become a CEO. Landing that first CEO job is tough, and I'm often asked for advice on how to do it. It's a tricky question. In my own work on CEO searches, it's unusual to see companies willing take a risk on someone who's never held the top job. Most boards of directors want a low risk candidate who has already been a CEO. So how does an aspiring CEO get the first shot at the corner office? I've seen it happen in the following ways:

  • They get promoted from within. This is by far the most common path. A CEO resigns or is fired, and the company suddenly faces a vacancy. By promoting an internal candidate, the company saves time and money, but more importantly it gets a known quantity who already knows the business.
  • They get hired by a trusted colleague. Another common path is winning the first CEO job through a trusted colleague. Maybe it's an investor who worked with the candidate at a prior business, or a former boss who's now sitting on the board of the hiring company. Whatever the case, there's a pre-existing relationship, and a lot of trust, that enables the hiring company to make the necessary leap of faith.
  • They make their own job. Entrepreneurially-minded people can appoint themselves CEO by starting their own company. Many well-known entrepreneurs — think of Steve Jobs or Bill Gates — became CEOs of their own companies at times when they would never have been considered for the job anywhere else.
  • They join a fixer-upper. A fourth path is through a troubled company where the board is having difficulty filling the CEO job. After they beat their heads against the wall trying to recruit a seasoned executive, they decide to give a first timer a shot. This can be a no-lose deal for the first time CEO. Turning around a bad situation will make her a hero, but failing won’t be a black mark on her record because the company was in deep trouble before she arrived.
What can you do to maximize your chances of becoming a CEO? I suggest a few simple steps:
  • Do great work. Without it, nothing else matters.
  • Tell people — both within your employer and outside — where you'd like to take your career. If they don't know about your aspirations, they may never think of you when opportunities arise.
  • Develop a mentor — or several mentors — who can give you candid advice. The learning curve is too steep to do it all yourself, so you must learn from the experience of people who came before you.
  • Finally, project confidence. If you don't believe you can handle the top job, no one else will, either.
Good luck!

September 8, 2016

Landing the First CEO Job

Many up and coming leaders aspire to become a CEO. Landing that first CEO job is tough, and I'm often asked for advice on how to do it. It's a tricky question. In my own work on CEO searches, it's unusual to see companies willing take a risk on someone who's never held the top job. Most boards of directors want a low risk candidate who has already been a CEO. So how does an aspiring CEO get the first shot at the corner office? I've seen it happen in the following ways:

  • They get promoted from within. This is by far the most common path. A CEO resigns or is fired, and the company suddenly faces a vacancy. By promoting an internal candidate, the company saves time and money, but more importantly it gets a known quantity who already knows the business.
  • They get hired by a trusted colleague. Another common path is winning the first CEO job through a trusted colleague. Maybe it's an investor who worked with the candidate at a prior business, or a former boss who's now sitting on the board of the hiring company. Whatever the case, there's a pre-existing relationship, and a lot of trust, that enables the hiring company to make the necessary leap of faith.
  • They make their own job. Entrepreneurially-minded people can appoint themselves CEO by starting their own company. Many well-known entrepreneurs — think of Steve Jobs or Bill Gates — became CEOs of their own companies at times when they would never have been considered for the job anywhere else.
  • They join a fixer-upper. A fourth path is through a troubled company where the board is having difficulty filling the CEO job. After they beat their heads against the wall trying to recruit a seasoned executive, they decide to give a first timer a shot. This can be a no-lose deal for the first time CEO. Turning around a bad situation will make her a hero, but failing won’t be a black mark on her record because the company was in deep trouble before she arrived.
What can you do to maximize your chances of becoming a CEO? I suggest a few simple steps:
  • Do great work. Without it, nothing else matters.
  • Tell people — both within your employer and outside — where you'd like to take your career. If they don't know about your aspirations, they may never think of you when opportunities arise.
  • Develop a mentor — or several mentors — who can give you candid advice. The learning curve is too steep to do it all yourself, so you must learn from the experience of people who came before you.
  • Finally, project confidence. If you don't believe you can handle the top job, no one else will, either.
Good luck!

September 8, 2016

Landing the First CEO Job

Many up and coming leaders aspire to become a CEO. Landing that first CEO job is tough, and I'm often asked for advice on how to do it. It's a tricky question. In my own work on CEO searches, it's unusual to see companies willing take a risk on someone who's never held the top job. Most boards of directors want a low risk candidate who has already been a CEO. So how does an aspiring CEO get the first shot at the corner office? I've seen it happen in the following ways:

  • They get promoted from within. This is by far the most common path. A CEO resigns or is fired, and the company suddenly faces a vacancy. By promoting an internal candidate, the company saves time and money, but more importantly it gets a known quantity who already knows the business.
  • They get hired by a trusted colleague. Another common path is winning the first CEO job through a trusted colleague. Maybe it's an investor who worked with the candidate at a prior business, or a former boss who's now sitting on the board of the hiring company. Whatever the case, there's a pre-existing relationship, and a lot of trust, that enables the hiring company to make the necessary leap of faith.
  • They make their own job. Entrepreneurially-minded people can appoint themselves CEO by starting their own company. Many well-known entrepreneurs — think of Steve Jobs or Bill Gates — became CEOs of their own companies at times when they would never have been considered for the job anywhere else.
  • They join a fixer-upper. A fourth path is through a troubled company where the board is having difficulty filling the CEO job. After they beat their heads against the wall trying to recruit a seasoned executive, they decide to give a first timer a shot. This can be a no-lose deal for the first time CEO. Turning around a bad situation will make her a hero, but failing won’t be a black mark on her record because the company was in deep trouble before she arrived.
What can you do to maximize your chances of becoming a CEO? I suggest a few simple steps:
  • Do great work. Without it, nothing else matters.
  • Tell people — both within your employer and outside — where you'd like to take your career. If they don't know about your aspirations, they may never think of you when opportunities arise.
  • Develop a mentor — or several mentors — who can give you candid advice. The learning curve is too steep to do it all yourself, so you must learn from the experience of people who came before you.
  • Finally, project confidence. If you don't believe you can handle the top job, no one else will, either.
Good luck!

September 8, 2016

Landing the First CEO Job

Many up and coming leaders aspire to become a CEO. Landing that first CEO job is tough, and I'm often asked for advice on how to do it. It's a tricky question. In my own work on CEO searches, it's unusual to see companies willing take a risk on someone who's never held the top job. Most boards of directors want a low risk candidate who has already been a CEO. So how does an aspiring CEO get the first shot at the corner office? I've seen it happen in the following ways:

  • They get promoted from within. This is by far the most common path. A CEO resigns or is fired, and the company suddenly faces a vacancy. By promoting an internal candidate, the company saves time and money, but more importantly it gets a known quantity who already knows the business.
  • They get hired by a trusted colleague. Another common path is winning the first CEO job through a trusted colleague. Maybe it's an investor who worked with the candidate at a prior business, or a former boss who's now sitting on the board of the hiring company. Whatever the case, there's a pre-existing relationship, and a lot of trust, that enables the hiring company to make the necessary leap of faith.
  • They make their own job. Entrepreneurially-minded people can appoint themselves CEO by starting their own company. Many well-known entrepreneurs — think of Steve Jobs or Bill Gates — became CEOs of their own companies at times when they would never have been considered for the job anywhere else.
  • They join a fixer-upper. A fourth path is through a troubled company where the board is having difficulty filling the CEO job. After they beat their heads against the wall trying to recruit a seasoned executive, they decide to give a first timer a shot. This can be a no-lose deal for the first time CEO. Turning around a bad situation will make her a hero, but failing won’t be a black mark on her record because the company was in deep trouble before she arrived.
What can you do to maximize your chances of becoming a CEO? I suggest a few simple steps:
  • Do great work. Without it, nothing else matters.
  • Tell people — both within your employer and outside — where you'd like to take your career. If they don't know about your aspirations, they may never think of you when opportunities arise.
  • Develop a mentor — or several mentors — who can give you candid advice. The learning curve is too steep to do it all yourself, so you must learn from the experience of people who came before you.
  • Finally, project confidence. If you don't believe you can handle the top job, no one else will, either.
Good luck!

September 8, 2016

Landing the First CEO Job

Many up and coming leaders aspire to become a CEO. Landing that first CEO job is tough, and I'm often asked for advice on how to do it. It's a tricky question. In my own work on CEO searches, it's unusual to see companies willing take a risk on someone who's never held the top job. Most boards of directors want a low risk candidate who has already been a CEO. So how does an aspiring CEO get the first shot at the corner office? I've seen it happen in the following ways:

  • They get promoted from within. This is by far the most common path. A CEO resigns or is fired, and the company suddenly faces a vacancy. By promoting an internal candidate, the company saves time and money, but more importantly it gets a known quantity who already knows the business.
  • They get hired by a trusted colleague. Another common path is winning the first CEO job through a trusted colleague. Maybe it's an investor who worked with the candidate at a prior business, or a former boss who's now sitting on the board of the hiring company. Whatever the case, there's a pre-existing relationship, and a lot of trust, that enables the hiring company to make the necessary leap of faith.
  • They make their own job. Entrepreneurially-minded people can appoint themselves CEO by starting their own company. Many well-known entrepreneurs — think of Steve Jobs or Bill Gates — became CEOs of their own companies at times when they would never have been considered for the job anywhere else.
  • They join a fixer-upper. A fourth path is through a troubled company where the board is having difficulty filling the CEO job. After they beat their heads against the wall trying to recruit a seasoned executive, they decide to give a first timer a shot. This can be a no-lose deal for the first time CEO. Turning around a bad situation will make her a hero, but failing won’t be a black mark on her record because the company was in deep trouble before she arrived.
What can you do to maximize your chances of becoming a CEO? I suggest a few simple steps:
  • Do great work. Without it, nothing else matters.
  • Tell people — both within your employer and outside — where you'd like to take your career. If they don't know about your aspirations, they may never think of you when opportunities arise.
  • Develop a mentor — or several mentors — who can give you candid advice. The learning curve is too steep to do it all yourself, so you must learn from the experience of people who came before you.
  • Finally, project confidence. If you don't believe you can handle the top job, no one else will, either.
Good luck!

September 8, 2016

Landing the First CEO Job

Many up and coming leaders aspire to become a CEO. Landing that first CEO job is tough, and I'm often asked for advice on how to do it. It's a tricky question. In my own work on CEO searches, it's unusual to see companies willing take a risk on someone who's never held the top job. Most boards of directors want a low risk candidate who has already been a CEO. So how does an aspiring CEO get the first shot at the corner office? I've seen it happen in the following ways:

  • They get promoted from within. This is by far the most common path. A CEO resigns or is fired, and the company suddenly faces a vacancy. By promoting an internal candidate, the company saves time and money, but more importantly it gets a known quantity who already knows the business.
  • They get hired by a trusted colleague. Another common path is winning the first CEO job through a trusted colleague. Maybe it's an investor who worked with the candidate at a prior business, or a former boss who's now sitting on the board of the hiring company. Whatever the case, there's a pre-existing relationship, and a lot of trust, that enables the hiring company to make the necessary leap of faith.
  • They make their own job. Entrepreneurially-minded people can appoint themselves CEO by starting their own company. Many well-known entrepreneurs — think of Steve Jobs or Bill Gates — became CEOs of their own companies at times when they would never have been considered for the job anywhere else.
  • They join a fixer-upper. A fourth path is through a troubled company where the board is having difficulty filling the CEO job. After they beat their heads against the wall trying to recruit a seasoned executive, they decide to give a first timer a shot. This can be a no-lose deal for the first time CEO. Turning around a bad situation will make her a hero, but failing won’t be a black mark on her record because the company was in deep trouble before she arrived.
What can you do to maximize your chances of becoming a CEO? I suggest a few simple steps:
  • Do great work. Without it, nothing else matters.
  • Tell people — both within your employer and outside — where you'd like to take your career. If they don't know about your aspirations, they may never think of you when opportunities arise.
  • Develop a mentor — or several mentors — who can give you candid advice. The learning curve is too steep to do it all yourself, so you must learn from the experience of people who came before you.
  • Finally, project confidence. If you don't believe you can handle the top job, no one else will, either.
Good luck!

September 8, 2016

Landing the First CEO Job

Many up and coming leaders aspire to become a CEO. Landing that first CEO job is tough, and I'm often asked for advice on how to do it. It's a tricky question. In my own work on CEO searches, it's unusual to see companies willing take a risk on someone who's never held the top job. Most boards of directors want a low risk candidate who has already been a CEO. So how does an aspiring CEO get the first shot at the corner office? I've seen it happen in the following ways:

  • They get promoted from within. This is by far the most common path. A CEO resigns or is fired, and the company suddenly faces a vacancy. By promoting an internal candidate, the company saves time and money, but more importantly it gets a known quantity who already knows the business.
  • They get hired by a trusted colleague. Another common path is winning the first CEO job through a trusted colleague. Maybe it's an investor who worked with the candidate at a prior business, or a former boss who's now sitting on the board of the hiring company. Whatever the case, there's a pre-existing relationship, and a lot of trust, that enables the hiring company to make the necessary leap of faith.
  • They make their own job. Entrepreneurially-minded people can appoint themselves CEO by starting their own company. Many well-known entrepreneurs — think of Steve Jobs or Bill Gates — became CEOs of their own companies at times when they would never have been considered for the job anywhere else.
  • They join a fixer-upper. A fourth path is through a troubled company where the board is having difficulty filling the CEO job. After they beat their heads against the wall trying to recruit a seasoned executive, they decide to give a first timer a shot. This can be a no-lose deal for the first time CEO. Turning around a bad situation will make her a hero, but failing won’t be a black mark on her record because the company was in deep trouble before she arrived.
What can you do to maximize your chances of becoming a CEO? I suggest a few simple steps:
  • Do great work. Without it, nothing else matters.
  • Tell people — both within your employer and outside — where you'd like to take your career. If they don't know about your aspirations, they may never think of you when opportunities arise.
  • Develop a mentor — or several mentors — who can give you candid advice. The learning curve is too steep to do it all yourself, so you must learn from the experience of people who came before you.
  • Finally, project confidence. If you don't believe you can handle the top job, no one else will, either.
Good luck!

September 8, 2016

Landing the First CEO Job

Many up and coming leaders aspire to become a CEO. Landing that first CEO job is tough, and I'm often asked for advice on how to do it. It's a tricky question. In my own work on CEO searches, it's unusual to see companies willing take a risk on someone who's never held the top job. Most boards of directors want a low risk candidate who has already been a CEO. So how does an aspiring CEO get the first shot at the corner office? I've seen it happen in the following ways:

  • They get promoted from within. This is by far the most common path. A CEO resigns or is fired, and the company suddenly faces a vacancy. By promoting an internal candidate, the company saves time and money, but more importantly it gets a known quantity who already knows the business.
  • They get hired by a trusted colleague. Another common path is winning the first CEO job through a trusted colleague. Maybe it's an investor who worked with the candidate at a prior business, or a former boss who's now sitting on the board of the hiring company. Whatever the case, there's a pre-existing relationship, and a lot of trust, that enables the hiring company to make the necessary leap of faith.
  • They make their own job. Entrepreneurially-minded people can appoint themselves CEO by starting their own company. Many well-known entrepreneurs — think of Steve Jobs or Bill Gates — became CEOs of their own companies at times when they would never have been considered for the job anywhere else.
  • They join a fixer-upper. A fourth path is through a troubled company where the board is having difficulty filling the CEO job. After they beat their heads against the wall trying to recruit a seasoned executive, they decide to give a first timer a shot. This can be a no-lose deal for the first time CEO. Turning around a bad situation will make her a hero, but failing won’t be a black mark on her record because the company was in deep trouble before she arrived.
What can you do to maximize your chances of becoming a CEO? I suggest a few simple steps:
  • Do great work. Without it, nothing else matters.
  • Tell people — both within your employer and outside — where you'd like to take your career. If they don't know about your aspirations, they may never think of you when opportunities arise.
  • Develop a mentor — or several mentors — who can give you candid advice. The learning curve is too steep to do it all yourself, so you must learn from the experience of people who came before you.
  • Finally, project confidence. If you don't believe you can handle the top job, no one else will, either.
Good luck!

September 8, 2016

Landing the First CEO Job

Many up and coming leaders aspire to become a CEO. Landing that first CEO job is tough, and I'm often asked for advice on how to do it. It's a tricky question. In my own work on CEO searches, it's unusual to see companies willing take a risk on someone who's never held the top job. Most boards of directors want a low risk candidate who has already been a CEO. So how does an aspiring CEO get the first shot at the corner office? I've seen it happen in the following ways:

  • They get promoted from within. This is by far the most common path. A CEO resigns or is fired, and the company suddenly faces a vacancy. By promoting an internal candidate, the company saves time and money, but more importantly it gets a known quantity who already knows the business.
  • They get hired by a trusted colleague. Another common path is winning the first CEO job through a trusted colleague. Maybe it's an investor who worked with the candidate at a prior business, or a former boss who's now sitting on the board of the hiring company. Whatever the case, there's a pre-existing relationship, and a lot of trust, that enables the hiring company to make the necessary leap of faith.
  • They make their own job. Entrepreneurially-minded people can appoint themselves CEO by starting their own company. Many well-known entrepreneurs — think of Steve Jobs or Bill Gates — became CEOs of their own companies at times when they would never have been considered for the job anywhere else.
  • They join a fixer-upper. A fourth path is through a troubled company where the board is having difficulty filling the CEO job. After they beat their heads against the wall trying to recruit a seasoned executive, they decide to give a first timer a shot. This can be a no-lose deal for the first time CEO. Turning around a bad situation will make her a hero, but failing won’t be a black mark on her record because the company was in deep trouble before she arrived.
What can you do to maximize your chances of becoming a CEO? I suggest a few simple steps:
  • Do great work. Without it, nothing else matters.
  • Tell people — both within your employer and outside — where you'd like to take your career. If they don't know about your aspirations, they may never think of you when opportunities arise.
  • Develop a mentor — or several mentors — who can give you candid advice. The learning curve is too steep to do it all yourself, so you must learn from the experience of people who came before you.
  • Finally, project confidence. If you don't believe you can handle the top job, no one else will, either.
Good luck!

September 8, 2016

Landing the First CEO Job

Many up and coming leaders aspire to become a CEO. Landing that first CEO job is tough, and I'm often asked for advice on how to do it. It's a tricky question. In my own work on CEO searches, it's unusual to see companies willing take a risk on someone who's never held the top job. Most boards of directors want a low risk candidate who has already been a CEO. So how does an aspiring CEO get the first shot at the corner office? I've seen it happen in the following ways:

  • They get promoted from within. This is by far the most common path. A CEO resigns or is fired, and the company suddenly faces a vacancy. By promoting an internal candidate, the company saves time and money, but more importantly it gets a known quantity who already knows the business.
  • They get hired by a trusted colleague. Another common path is winning the first CEO job through a trusted colleague. Maybe it's an investor who worked with the candidate at a prior business, or a former boss who's now sitting on the board of the hiring company. Whatever the case, there's a pre-existing relationship, and a lot of trust, that enables the hiring company to make the necessary leap of faith.
  • They make their own job. Entrepreneurially-minded people can appoint themselves CEO by starting their own company. Many well-known entrepreneurs — think of Steve Jobs or Bill Gates — became CEOs of their own companies at times when they would never have been considered for the job anywhere else.
  • They join a fixer-upper. A fourth path is through a troubled company where the board is having difficulty filling the CEO job. After they beat their heads against the wall trying to recruit a seasoned executive, they decide to give a first timer a shot. This can be a no-lose deal for the first time CEO. Turning around a bad situation will make her a hero, but failing won’t be a black mark on her record because the company was in deep trouble before she arrived.
What can you do to maximize your chances of becoming a CEO? I suggest a few simple steps:
  • Do great work. Without it, nothing else matters.
  • Tell people — both within your employer and outside — where you'd like to take your career. If they don't know about your aspirations, they may never think of you when opportunities arise.
  • Develop a mentor — or several mentors — who can give you candid advice. The learning curve is too steep to do it all yourself, so you must learn from the experience of people who came before you.
  • Finally, project confidence. If you don't believe you can handle the top job, no one else will, either.
Good luck!

September 8, 2016

Landing the First CEO Job

Many up and coming leaders aspire to become a CEO. Landing that first CEO job is tough, and I'm often asked for advice on how to do it. It's a tricky question. In my own work on CEO searches, it's unusual to see companies willing take a risk on someone who's never held the top job. Most boards of directors want a low risk candidate who has already been a CEO. So how does an aspiring CEO get the first shot at the corner office? I've seen it happen in the following ways:

  • They get promoted from within. This is by far the most common path. A CEO resigns or is fired, and the company suddenly faces a vacancy. By promoting an internal candidate, the company saves time and money, but more importantly it gets a known quantity who already knows the business.
  • They get hired by a trusted colleague. Another common path is winning the first CEO job through a trusted colleague. Maybe it's an investor who worked with the candidate at a prior business, or a former boss who's now sitting on the board of the hiring company. Whatever the case, there's a pre-existing relationship, and a lot of trust, that enables the hiring company to make the necessary leap of faith.
  • They make their own job. Entrepreneurially-minded people can appoint themselves CEO by starting their own company. Many well-known entrepreneurs — think of Steve Jobs or Bill Gates — became CEOs of their own companies at times when they would never have been considered for the job anywhere else.
  • They join a fixer-upper. A fourth path is through a troubled company where the board is having difficulty filling the CEO job. After they beat their heads against the wall trying to recruit a seasoned executive, they decide to give a first timer a shot. This can be a no-lose deal for the first time CEO. Turning around a bad situation will make her a hero, but failing won’t be a black mark on her record because the company was in deep trouble before she arrived.
What can you do to maximize your chances of becoming a CEO? I suggest a few simple steps:
  • Do great work. Without it, nothing else matters.
  • Tell people — both within your employer and outside — where you'd like to take your career. If they don't know about your aspirations, they may never think of you when opportunities arise.
  • Develop a mentor — or several mentors — who can give you candid advice. The learning curve is too steep to do it all yourself, so you must learn from the experience of people who came before you.
  • Finally, project confidence. If you don't believe you can handle the top job, no one else will, either.
Good luck!

September 8, 2016

Landing the First CEO Job

Many up and coming leaders aspire to become a CEO. Landing that first CEO job is tough, and I'm often asked for advice on how to do it. It's a tricky question. In my own work on CEO searches, it's unusual to see companies willing take a risk on someone who's never held the top job. Most boards of directors want a low risk candidate who has already been a CEO. So how does an aspiring CEO get the first shot at the corner office? I've seen it happen in the following ways:

  • They get promoted from within. This is by far the most common path. A CEO resigns or is fired, and the company suddenly faces a vacancy. By promoting an internal candidate, the company saves time and money, but more importantly it gets a known quantity who already knows the business.
  • They get hired by a trusted colleague. Another common path is winning the first CEO job through a trusted colleague. Maybe it's an investor who worked with the candidate at a prior business, or a former boss who's now sitting on the board of the hiring company. Whatever the case, there's a pre-existing relationship, and a lot of trust, that enables the hiring company to make the necessary leap of faith.
  • They make their own job. Entrepreneurially-minded people can appoint themselves CEO by starting their own company. Many well-known entrepreneurs — think of Steve Jobs or Bill Gates — became CEOs of their own companies at times when they would never have been considered for the job anywhere else.
  • They join a fixer-upper. A fourth path is through a troubled company where the board is having difficulty filling the CEO job. After they beat their heads against the wall trying to recruit a seasoned executive, they decide to give a first timer a shot. This can be a no-lose deal for the first time CEO. Turning around a bad situation will make her a hero, but failing won’t be a black mark on her record because the company was in deep trouble before she arrived.
What can you do to maximize your chances of becoming a CEO? I suggest a few simple steps:
  • Do great work. Without it, nothing else matters.
  • Tell people — both within your employer and outside — where you'd like to take your career. If they don't know about your aspirations, they may never think of you when opportunities arise.
  • Develop a mentor — or several mentors — who can give you candid advice. The learning curve is too steep to do it all yourself, so you must learn from the experience of people who came before you.
  • Finally, project confidence. If you don't believe you can handle the top job, no one else will, either.
Good luck!

September 8, 2016

Landing the First CEO Job

Many up and coming leaders aspire to become a CEO. Landing that first CEO job is tough, and I'm often asked for advice on how to do it. It's a tricky question. In my own work on CEO searches, it's unusual to see companies willing take a risk on someone who's never held the top job. Most boards of directors want a low risk candidate who has already been a CEO. So how does an aspiring CEO get the first shot at the corner office? I've seen it happen in the following ways:

  • They get promoted from within. This is by far the most common path. A CEO resigns or is fired, and the company suddenly faces a vacancy. By promoting an internal candidate, the company saves time and money, but more importantly it gets a known quantity who already knows the business.
  • They get hired by a trusted colleague. Another common path is winning the first CEO job through a trusted colleague. Maybe it's an investor who worked with the candidate at a prior business, or a former boss who's now sitting on the board of the hiring company. Whatever the case, there's a pre-existing relationship, and a lot of trust, that enables the hiring company to make the necessary leap of faith.
  • They make their own job. Entrepreneurially-minded people can appoint themselves CEO by starting their own company. Many well-known entrepreneurs — think of Steve Jobs or Bill Gates — became CEOs of their own companies at times when they would never have been considered for the job anywhere else.
  • They join a fixer-upper. A fourth path is through a troubled company where the board is having difficulty filling the CEO job. After they beat their heads against the wall trying to recruit a seasoned executive, they decide to give a first timer a shot. This can be a no-lose deal for the first time CEO. Turning around a bad situation will make her a hero, but failing won’t be a black mark on her record because the company was in deep trouble before she arrived.
What can you do to maximize your chances of becoming a CEO? I suggest a few simple steps:
  • Do great work. Without it, nothing else matters.
  • Tell people — both within your employer and outside — where you'd like to take your career. If they don't know about your aspirations, they may never think of you when opportunities arise.
  • Develop a mentor — or several mentors — who can give you candid advice. The learning curve is too steep to do it all yourself, so you must learn from the experience of people who came before you.
  • Finally, project confidence. If you don't believe you can handle the top job, no one else will, either.
Good luck!

September 8, 2016

Landing the First CEO Job

Many up and coming leaders aspire to become a CEO. Landing that first CEO job is tough, and I'm often asked for advice on how to do it. It's a tricky question. In my own work on CEO searches, it's unusual to see companies willing take a risk on someone who's never held the top job. Most boards of directors want a low risk candidate who has already been a CEO. So how does an aspiring CEO get the first shot at the corner office? I've seen it happen in the following ways:

  • They get promoted from within. This is by far the most common path. A CEO resigns or is fired, and the company suddenly faces a vacancy. By promoting an internal candidate, the company saves time and money, but more importantly it gets a known quantity who already knows the business.
  • They get hired by a trusted colleague. Another common path is winning the first CEO job through a trusted colleague. Maybe it's an investor who worked with the candidate at a prior business, or a former boss who's now sitting on the board of the hiring company. Whatever the case, there's a pre-existing relationship, and a lot of trust, that enables the hiring company to make the necessary leap of faith.
  • They make their own job. Entrepreneurially-minded people can appoint themselves CEO by starting their own company. Many well-known entrepreneurs — think of Steve Jobs or Bill Gates — became CEOs of their own companies at times when they would never have been considered for the job anywhere else.
  • They join a fixer-upper. A fourth path is through a troubled company where the board is having difficulty filling the CEO job. After they beat their heads against the wall trying to recruit a seasoned executive, they decide to give a first timer a shot. This can be a no-lose deal for the first time CEO. Turning around a bad situation will make her a hero, but failing won’t be a black mark on her record because the company was in deep trouble before she arrived.
What can you do to maximize your chances of becoming a CEO? I suggest a few simple steps:
  • Do great work. Without it, nothing else matters.
  • Tell people — both within your employer and outside — where you'd like to take your career. If they don't know about your aspirations, they may never think of you when opportunities arise.
  • Develop a mentor — or several mentors — who can give you candid advice. The learning curve is too steep to do it all yourself, so you must learn from the experience of people who came before you.
  • Finally, project confidence. If you don't believe you can handle the top job, no one else will, either.
Good luck!

September 8, 2016

Landing the First CEO Job

Many up and coming leaders aspire to become a CEO. Landing that first CEO job is tough, and I'm often asked for advice on how to do it. It's a tricky question. In my own work on CEO searches, it's unusual to see companies willing take a risk on someone who's never held the top job. Most boards of directors want a low risk candidate who has already been a CEO. So how does an aspiring CEO get the first shot at the corner office? I've seen it happen in the following ways:

  • They get promoted from within. This is by far the most common path. A CEO resigns or is fired, and the company suddenly faces a vacancy. By promoting an internal candidate, the company saves time and money, but more importantly it gets a known quantity who already knows the business.
  • They get hired by a trusted colleague. Another common path is winning the first CEO job through a trusted colleague. Maybe it's an investor who worked with the candidate at a prior business, or a former boss who's now sitting on the board of the hiring company. Whatever the case, there's a pre-existing relationship, and a lot of trust, that enables the hiring company to make the necessary leap of faith.
  • They make their own job. Entrepreneurially-minded people can appoint themselves CEO by starting their own company. Many well-known entrepreneurs — think of Steve Jobs or Bill Gates — became CEOs of their own companies at times when they would never have been considered for the job anywhere else.
  • They join a fixer-upper. A fourth path is through a troubled company where the board is having difficulty filling the CEO job. After they beat their heads against the wall trying to recruit a seasoned executive, they decide to give a first timer a shot. This can be a no-lose deal for the first time CEO. Turning around a bad situation will make her a hero, but failing won’t be a black mark on her record because the company was in deep trouble before she arrived.
What can you do to maximize your chances of becoming a CEO? I suggest a few simple steps:
  • Do great work. Without it, nothing else matters.
  • Tell people — both within your employer and outside — where you'd like to take your career. If they don't know about your aspirations, they may never think of you when opportunities arise.
  • Develop a mentor — or several mentors — who can give you candid advice. The learning curve is too steep to do it all yourself, so you must learn from the experience of people who came before you.
  • Finally, project confidence. If you don't believe you can handle the top job, no one else will, either.
Good luck!

September 8, 2016

Landing the First CEO Job

Many up and coming leaders aspire to become a CEO. Landing that first CEO job is tough, and I'm often asked for advice on how to do it. It's a tricky question. In my own work on CEO searches, it's unusual to see companies willing take a risk on someone who's never held the top job. Most boards of directors want a low risk candidate who has already been a CEO. So how does an aspiring CEO get the first shot at the corner office? I've seen it happen in the following ways:

  • They get promoted from within. This is by far the most common path. A CEO resigns or is fired, and the company suddenly faces a vacancy. By promoting an internal candidate, the company saves time and money, but more importantly it gets a known quantity who already knows the business.
  • They get hired by a trusted colleague. Another common path is winning the first CEO job through a trusted colleague. Maybe it's an investor who worked with the candidate at a prior business, or a former boss who's now sitting on the board of the hiring company. Whatever the case, there's a pre-existing relationship, and a lot of trust, that enables the hiring company to make the necessary leap of faith.
  • They make their own job. Entrepreneurially-minded people can appoint themselves CEO by starting their own company. Many well-known entrepreneurs — think of Steve Jobs or Bill Gates — became CEOs of their own companies at times when they would never have been considered for the job anywhere else.
  • They join a fixer-upper. A fourth path is through a troubled company where the board is having difficulty filling the CEO job. After they beat their heads against the wall trying to recruit a seasoned executive, they decide to give a first timer a shot. This can be a no-lose deal for the first time CEO. Turning around a bad situation will make her a hero, but failing won’t be a black mark on her record because the company was in deep trouble before she arrived.
What can you do to maximize your chances of becoming a CEO? I suggest a few simple steps:
  • Do great work. Without it, nothing else matters.
  • Tell people — both within your employer and outside — where you'd like to take your career. If they don't know about your aspirations, they may never think of you when opportunities arise.
  • Develop a mentor — or several mentors — who can give you candid advice. The learning curve is too steep to do it all yourself, so you must learn from the experience of people who came before you.
  • Finally, project confidence. If you don't believe you can handle the top job, no one else will, either.
Good luck!

September 8, 2016

Landing the First CEO Job

Many up and coming leaders aspire to become a CEO. Landing that first CEO job is tough, and I'm often asked for advice on how to do it. It's a tricky question. In my own work on CEO searches, it's unusual to see companies willing take a risk on someone who's never held the top job. Most boards of directors want a low risk candidate who has already been a CEO. So how does an aspiring CEO get the first shot at the corner office? I've seen it happen in the following ways:

  • They get promoted from within. This is by far the most common path. A CEO resigns or is fired, and the company suddenly faces a vacancy. By promoting an internal candidate, the company saves time and money, but more importantly it gets a known quantity who already knows the business.
  • They get hired by a trusted colleague. Another common path is winning the first CEO job through a trusted colleague. Maybe it's an investor who worked with the candidate at a prior business, or a former boss who's now sitting on the board of the hiring company. Whatever the case, there's a pre-existing relationship, and a lot of trust, that enables the hiring company to make the necessary leap of faith.
  • They make their own job. Entrepreneurially-minded people can appoint themselves CEO by starting their own company. Many well-known entrepreneurs — think of Steve Jobs or Bill Gates — became CEOs of their own companies at times when they would never have been considered for the job anywhere else.
  • They join a fixer-upper. A fourth path is through a troubled company where the board is having difficulty filling the CEO job. After they beat their heads against the wall trying to recruit a seasoned executive, they decide to give a first timer a shot. This can be a no-lose deal for the first time CEO. Turning around a bad situation will make her a hero, but failing won’t be a black mark on her record because the company was in deep trouble before she arrived.
What can you do to maximize your chances of becoming a CEO? I suggest a few simple steps:
  • Do great work. Without it, nothing else matters.
  • Tell people — both within your employer and outside — where you'd like to take your career. If they don't know about your aspirations, they may never think of you when opportunities arise.
  • Develop a mentor — or several mentors — who can give you candid advice. The learning curve is too steep to do it all yourself, so you must learn from the experience of people who came before you.
  • Finally, project confidence. If you don't believe you can handle the top job, no one else will, either.
Good luck!

September 8, 2016

Landing the First CEO Job

Many up and coming leaders aspire to become a CEO. Landing that first CEO job is tough, and I'm often asked for advice on how to do it. It's a tricky question. In my own work on CEO searches, it's unusual to see companies willing take a risk on someone who's never held the top job. Most boards of directors want a low risk candidate who has already been a CEO. So how does an aspiring CEO get the first shot at the corner office? I've seen it happen in the following ways:

  • They get promoted from within. This is by far the most common path. A CEO resigns or is fired, and the company suddenly faces a vacancy. By promoting an internal candidate, the company saves time and money, but more importantly it gets a known quantity who already knows the business.
  • They get hired by a trusted colleague. Another common path is winning the first CEO job through a trusted colleague. Maybe it's an investor who worked with the candidate at a prior business, or a former boss who's now sitting on the board of the hiring company. Whatever the case, there's a pre-existing relationship, and a lot of trust, that enables the hiring company to make the necessary leap of faith.
  • They make their own job. Entrepreneurially-minded people can appoint themselves CEO by starting their own company. Many well-known entrepreneurs — think of Steve Jobs or Bill Gates — became CEOs of their own companies at times when they would never have been considered for the job anywhere else.
  • They join a fixer-upper. A fourth path is through a troubled company where the board is having difficulty filling the CEO job. After they beat their heads against the wall trying to recruit a seasoned executive, they decide to give a first timer a shot. This can be a no-lose deal for the first time CEO. Turning around a bad situation will make her a hero, but failing won’t be a black mark on her record because the company was in deep trouble before she arrived.
What can you do to maximize your chances of becoming a CEO? I suggest a few simple steps:
  • Do great work. Without it, nothing else matters.
  • Tell people — both within your employer and outside — where you'd like to take your career. If they don't know about your aspirations, they may never think of you when opportunities arise.
  • Develop a mentor — or several mentors — who can give you candid advice. The learning curve is too steep to do it all yourself, so you must learn from the experience of people who came before you.
  • Finally, project confidence. If you don't believe you can handle the top job, no one else will, either.
Good luck!

September 8, 2016

Landing the First CEO Job

Many up and coming leaders aspire to become a CEO. Landing that first CEO job is tough, and I'm often asked for advice on how to do it. It's a tricky question. In my own work on CEO searches, it's unusual to see companies willing take a risk on someone who's never held the top job. Most boards of directors want a low risk candidate who has already been a CEO. So how does an aspiring CEO get the first shot at the corner office? I've seen it happen in the following ways:

  • They get promoted from within. This is by far the most common path. A CEO resigns or is fired, and the company suddenly faces a vacancy. By promoting an internal candidate, the company saves time and money, but more importantly it gets a known quantity who already knows the business.
  • They get hired by a trusted colleague. Another common path is winning the first CEO job through a trusted colleague. Maybe it's an investor who worked with the candidate at a prior business, or a former boss who's now sitting on the board of the hiring company. Whatever the case, there's a pre-existing relationship, and a lot of trust, that enables the hiring company to make the necessary leap of faith.
  • They make their own job. Entrepreneurially-minded people can appoint themselves CEO by starting their own company. Many well-known entrepreneurs — think of Steve Jobs or Bill Gates — became CEOs of their own companies at times when they would never have been considered for the job anywhere else.
  • They join a fixer-upper. A fourth path is through a troubled company where the board is having difficulty filling the CEO job. After they beat their heads against the wall trying to recruit a seasoned executive, they decide to give a first timer a shot. This can be a no-lose deal for the first time CEO. Turning around a bad situation will make her a hero, but failing won’t be a black mark on her record because the company was in deep trouble before she arrived.
What can you do to maximize your chances of becoming a CEO? I suggest a few simple steps:
  • Do great work. Without it, nothing else matters.
  • Tell people — both within your employer and outside — where you'd like to take your career. If they don't know about your aspirations, they may never think of you when opportunities arise.
  • Develop a mentor — or several mentors — who can give you candid advice. The learning curve is too steep to do it all yourself, so you must learn from the experience of people who came before you.
  • Finally, project confidence. If you don't believe you can handle the top job, no one else will, either.
Good luck!

September 8, 2016

Landing the First CEO Job

Many up and coming leaders aspire to become a CEO. Landing that first CEO job is tough, and I'm often asked for advice on how to do it. It's a tricky question. In my own work on CEO searches, it's unusual to see companies willing take a risk on someone who's never held the top job. Most boards of directors want a low risk candidate who has already been a CEO. So how does an aspiring CEO get the first shot at the corner office? I've seen it happen in the following ways:

  • They get promoted from within. This is by far the most common path. A CEO resigns or is fired, and the company suddenly faces a vacancy. By promoting an internal candidate, the company saves time and money, but more importantly it gets a known quantity who already knows the business.
  • They get hired by a trusted colleague. Another common path is winning the first CEO job through a trusted colleague. Maybe it's an investor who worked with the candidate at a prior business, or a former boss who's now sitting on the board of the hiring company. Whatever the case, there's a pre-existing relationship, and a lot of trust, that enables the hiring company to make the necessary leap of faith.
  • They make their own job. Entrepreneurially-minded people can appoint themselves CEO by starting their own company. Many well-known entrepreneurs — think of Steve Jobs or Bill Gates — became CEOs of their own companies at times when they would never have been considered for the job anywhere else.
  • They join a fixer-upper. A fourth path is through a troubled company where the board is having difficulty filling the CEO job. After they beat their heads against the wall trying to recruit a seasoned executive, they decide to give a first timer a shot. This can be a no-lose deal for the first time CEO. Turning around a bad situation will make her a hero, but failing won’t be a black mark on her record because the company was in deep trouble before she arrived.
What can you do to maximize your chances of becoming a CEO? I suggest a few simple steps:
  • Do great work. Without it, nothing else matters.
  • Tell people — both within your employer and outside — where you'd like to take your career. If they don't know about your aspirations, they may never think of you when opportunities arise.
  • Develop a mentor — or several mentors — who can give you candid advice. The learning curve is too steep to do it all yourself, so you must learn from the experience of people who came before you.
  • Finally, project confidence. If you don't believe you can handle the top job, no one else will, either.
Good luck!

September 8, 2016

Landing the First CEO Job

Many up and coming leaders aspire to become a CEO. Landing that first CEO job is tough, and I'm often asked for advice on how to do it. It's a tricky question. In my own work on CEO searches, it's unusual to see companies willing take a risk on someone who's never held the top job. Most boards of directors want a low risk candidate who has already been a CEO. So how does an aspiring CEO get the first shot at the corner office? I've seen it happen in the following ways:

  • They get promoted from within. This is by far the most common path. A CEO resigns or is fired, and the company suddenly faces a vacancy. By promoting an internal candidate, the company saves time and money, but more importantly it gets a known quantity who already knows the business.
  • They get hired by a trusted colleague. Another common path is winning the first CEO job through a trusted colleague. Maybe it's an investor who worked with the candidate at a prior business, or a former boss who's now sitting on the board of the hiring company. Whatever the case, there's a pre-existing relationship, and a lot of trust, that enables the hiring company to make the necessary leap of faith.
  • They make their own job. Entrepreneurially-minded people can appoint themselves CEO by starting their own company. Many well-known entrepreneurs — think of Steve Jobs or Bill Gates — became CEOs of their own companies at times when they would never have been considered for the job anywhere else.
  • They join a fixer-upper. A fourth path is through a troubled company where the board is having difficulty filling the CEO job. After they beat their heads against the wall trying to recruit a seasoned executive, they decide to give a first timer a shot. This can be a no-lose deal for the first time CEO. Turning around a bad situation will make her a hero, but failing won’t be a black mark on her record because the company was in deep trouble before she arrived.
What can you do to maximize your chances of becoming a CEO? I suggest a few simple steps:
  • Do great work. Without it, nothing else matters.
  • Tell people — both within your employer and outside — where you'd like to take your career. If they don't know about your aspirations, they may never think of you when opportunities arise.
  • Develop a mentor — or several mentors — who can give you candid advice. The learning curve is too steep to do it all yourself, so you must learn from the experience of people who came before you.
  • Finally, project confidence. If you don't believe you can handle the top job, no one else will, either.
Good luck!

September 8, 2016

Landing the First CEO Job

Many up and coming leaders aspire to become a CEO. Landing that first CEO job is tough, and I'm often asked for advice on how to do it. It's a tricky question. In my own work on CEO searches, it's unusual to see companies willing take a risk on someone who's never held the top job. Most boards of directors want a low risk candidate who has already been a CEO. So how does an aspiring CEO get the first shot at the corner office? I've seen it happen in the following ways:

  • They get promoted from within. This is by far the most common path. A CEO resigns or is fired, and the company suddenly faces a vacancy. By promoting an internal candidate, the company saves time and money, but more importantly it gets a known quantity who already knows the business.
  • They get hired by a trusted colleague. Another common path is winning the first CEO job through a trusted colleague. Maybe it's an investor who worked with the candidate at a prior business, or a former boss who's now sitting on the board of the hiring company. Whatever the case, there's a pre-existing relationship, and a lot of trust, that enables the hiring company to make the necessary leap of faith.
  • They make their own job. Entrepreneurially-minded people can appoint themselves CEO by starting their own company. Many well-known entrepreneurs — think of Steve Jobs or Bill Gates — became CEOs of their own companies at times when they would never have been considered for the job anywhere else.
  • They join a fixer-upper. A fourth path is through a troubled company where the board is having difficulty filling the CEO job. After they beat their heads against the wall trying to recruit a seasoned executive, they decide to give a first timer a shot. This can be a no-lose deal for the first time CEO. Turning around a bad situation will make her a hero, but failing won’t be a black mark on her record because the company was in deep trouble before she arrived.
What can you do to maximize your chances of becoming a CEO? I suggest a few simple steps:
  • Do great work. Without it, nothing else matters.
  • Tell people — both within your employer and outside — where you'd like to take your career. If they don't know about your aspirations, they may never think of you when opportunities arise.
  • Develop a mentor — or several mentors — who can give you candid advice. The learning curve is too steep to do it all yourself, so you must learn from the experience of people who came before you.
  • Finally, project confidence. If you don't believe you can handle the top job, no one else will, either.
Good luck!

September 8, 2016

Landing the First CEO Job

Many up and coming leaders aspire to become a CEO. Landing that first CEO job is tough, and I'm often asked for advice on how to do it. It's a tricky question. In my own work on CEO searches, it's unusual to see companies willing take a risk on someone who's never held the top job. Most boards of directors want a low risk candidate who has already been a CEO. So how does an aspiring CEO get the first shot at the corner office? I've seen it happen in the following ways:

  • They get promoted from within. This is by far the most common path. A CEO resigns or is fired, and the company suddenly faces a vacancy. By promoting an internal candidate, the company saves time and money, but more importantly it gets a known quantity who already knows the business.
  • They get hired by a trusted colleague. Another common path is winning the first CEO job through a trusted colleague. Maybe it's an investor who worked with the candidate at a prior business, or a former boss who's now sitting on the board of the hiring company. Whatever the case, there's a pre-existing relationship, and a lot of trust, that enables the hiring company to make the necessary leap of faith.
  • They make their own job. Entrepreneurially-minded people can appoint themselves CEO by starting their own company. Many well-known entrepreneurs — think of Steve Jobs or Bill Gates — became CEOs of their own companies at times when they would never have been considered for the job anywhere else.
  • They join a fixer-upper. A fourth path is through a troubled company where the board is having difficulty filling the CEO job. After they beat their heads against the wall trying to recruit a seasoned executive, they decide to give a first timer a shot. This can be a no-lose deal for the first time CEO. Turning around a bad situation will make her a hero, but failing won’t be a black mark on her record because the company was in deep trouble before she arrived.
What can you do to maximize your chances of becoming a CEO? I suggest a few simple steps:
  • Do great work. Without it, nothing else matters.
  • Tell people — both within your employer and outside — where you'd like to take your career. If they don't know about your aspirations, they may never think of you when opportunities arise.
  • Develop a mentor — or several mentors — who can give you candid advice. The learning curve is too steep to do it all yourself, so you must learn from the experience of people who came before you.
  • Finally, project confidence. If you don't believe you can handle the top job, no one else will, either.
Good luck!

September 8, 2016

Landing the First CEO Job

Many up and coming leaders aspire to become a CEO. Landing that first CEO job is tough, and I'm often asked for advice on how to do it. It's a tricky question. In my own work on CEO searches, it's unusual to see companies willing take a risk on someone who's never held the top job. Most boards of directors want a low risk candidate who has already been a CEO. So how does an aspiring CEO get the first shot at the corner office? I've seen it happen in the following ways:

  • They get promoted from within. This is by far the most common path. A CEO resigns or is fired, and the company suddenly faces a vacancy. By promoting an internal candidate, the company saves time and money, but more importantly it gets a known quantity who already knows the business.
  • They get hired by a trusted colleague. Another common path is winning the first CEO job through a trusted colleague. Maybe it's an investor who worked with the candidate at a prior business, or a former boss who's now sitting on the board of the hiring company. Whatever the case, there's a pre-existing relationship, and a lot of trust, that enables the hiring company to make the necessary leap of faith.
  • They make their own job. Entrepreneurially-minded people can appoint themselves CEO by starting their own company. Many well-known entrepreneurs — think of Steve Jobs or Bill Gates — became CEOs of their own companies at times when they would never have been considered for the job anywhere else.
  • They join a fixer-upper. A fourth path is through a troubled company where the board is having difficulty filling the CEO job. After they beat their heads against the wall trying to recruit a seasoned executive, they decide to give a first timer a shot. This can be a no-lose deal for the first time CEO. Turning around a bad situation will make her a hero, but failing won’t be a black mark on her record because the company was in deep trouble before she arrived.
What can you do to maximize your chances of becoming a CEO? I suggest a few simple steps:
  • Do great work. Without it, nothing else matters.
  • Tell people — both within your employer and outside — where you'd like to take your career. If they don't know about your aspirations, they may never think of you when opportunities arise.
  • Develop a mentor — or several mentors — who can give you candid advice. The learning curve is too steep to do it all yourself, so you must learn from the experience of people who came before you.
  • Finally, project confidence. If you don't believe you can handle the top job, no one else will, either.
Good luck!

September 6, 2016

What Does It Take To Run A Subsidiary?

In the last several years I’ve done a number of searches for presidents of the US subsidiaries of foreign companies. These jobs present several special challenges. In no particular order, here they are:

  • First, they require knowledge of how to work with people from different cultures. That doesn't necessarily mean prior experience working for a foreign company, though that usually helps. It could come from experience with family members (like if mom and dad are immigrants) or from living overseas.
  • Second, it requires top-tier communication skills. Communication is always critical, of course, but it's even more important when dealing with a home office that's thousands of miles and many time zones away, and where differences of language and culture can easily lead to misunderstandings.
  • Third, it requires flexibility. Sometimes the home office wants to do things a certain way because that's just the way they do it. Provided their approach works, you need to go with the flow. Save your energy for issues that really matter to the business.
  • Finally, it requires understanding the role and what you can and cannot change. Running a subsidiary means certain key decisions will be made at the home office. As president, you'll have input, but not final say. You need to be comfortable with that.

If this sounds good to you, consider opportunities to run a subsidiary.Running a subsidiary company can be interesting, fun and extremely rewarding. In our increasingly globalized world, it's also a valuable resume builder.

September 6, 2016

What Does It Take To Run A Subsidiary?

In the last several years I’ve done a number of searches for presidents of the US subsidiaries of foreign companies. These jobs present several special challenges. In no particular order, here they are:

  • First, they require knowledge of how to work with people from different cultures. That doesn't necessarily mean prior experience working for a foreign company, though that usually helps. It could come from experience with family members (like if mom and dad are immigrants) or from living overseas.
  • Second, it requires top-tier communication skills. Communication is always critical, of course, but it's even more important when dealing with a home office that's thousands of miles and many time zones away, and where differences of language and culture can easily lead to misunderstandings.
  • Third, it requires flexibility. Sometimes the home office wants to do things a certain way because that's just the way they do it. Provided their approach works, you need to go with the flow. Save your energy for issues that really matter to the business.
  • Finally, it requires understanding the role and what you can and cannot change. Running a subsidiary means certain key decisions will be made at the home office. As president, you'll have input, but not final say. You need to be comfortable with that.

If this sounds good to you, consider opportunities to run a subsidiary.Running a subsidiary company can be interesting, fun and extremely rewarding. In our increasingly globalized world, it's also a valuable resume builder.

September 6, 2016

What Does It Take To Run A Subsidiary?

In the last several years I’ve done a number of searches for presidents of the US subsidiaries of foreign companies. These jobs present several special challenges. In no particular order, here they are:

  • First, they require knowledge of how to work with people from different cultures. That doesn't necessarily mean prior experience working for a foreign company, though that usually helps. It could come from experience with family members (like if mom and dad are immigrants) or from living overseas.
  • Second, it requires top-tier communication skills. Communication is always critical, of course, but it's even more important when dealing with a home office that's thousands of miles and many time zones away, and where differences of language and culture can easily lead to misunderstandings.
  • Third, it requires flexibility. Sometimes the home office wants to do things a certain way because that's just the way they do it. Provided their approach works, you need to go with the flow. Save your energy for issues that really matter to the business.
  • Finally, it requires understanding the role and what you can and cannot change. Running a subsidiary means certain key decisions will be made at the home office. As president, you'll have input, but not final say. You need to be comfortable with that.

If this sounds good to you, consider opportunities to run a subsidiary.Running a subsidiary company can be interesting, fun and extremely rewarding. In our increasingly globalized world, it's also a valuable resume builder.

September 6, 2016

What Does It Take To Run A Subsidiary?

In the last several years I’ve done a number of searches for presidents of the US subsidiaries of foreign companies. These jobs present several special challenges. In no particular order, here they are:

  • First, they require knowledge of how to work with people from different cultures. That doesn't necessarily mean prior experience working for a foreign company, though that usually helps. It could come from experience with family members (like if mom and dad are immigrants) or from living overseas.
  • Second, it requires top-tier communication skills. Communication is always critical, of course, but it's even more important when dealing with a home office that's thousands of miles and many time zones away, and where differences of language and culture can easily lead to misunderstandings.
  • Third, it requires flexibility. Sometimes the home office wants to do things a certain way because that's just the way they do it. Provided their approach works, you need to go with the flow. Save your energy for issues that really matter to the business.
  • Finally, it requires understanding the role and what you can and cannot change. Running a subsidiary means certain key decisions will be made at the home office. As president, you'll have input, but not final say. You need to be comfortable with that.

If this sounds good to you, consider opportunities to run a subsidiary.Running a subsidiary company can be interesting, fun and extremely rewarding. In our increasingly globalized world, it's also a valuable resume builder.

September 6, 2016

What Does It Take To Run A Subsidiary?

In the last several years I’ve done a number of searches for presidents of the US subsidiaries of foreign companies. These jobs present several special challenges. In no particular order, here they are:

  • First, they require knowledge of how to work with people from different cultures. That doesn't necessarily mean prior experience working for a foreign company, though that usually helps. It could come from experience with family members (like if mom and dad are immigrants) or from living overseas.
  • Second, it requires top-tier communication skills. Communication is always critical, of course, but it's even more important when dealing with a home office that's thousands of miles and many time zones away, and where differences of language and culture can easily lead to misunderstandings.
  • Third, it requires flexibility. Sometimes the home office wants to do things a certain way because that's just the way they do it. Provided their approach works, you need to go with the flow. Save your energy for issues that really matter to the business.
  • Finally, it requires understanding the role and what you can and cannot change. Running a subsidiary means certain key decisions will be made at the home office. As president, you'll have input, but not final say. You need to be comfortable with that.

If this sounds good to you, consider opportunities to run a subsidiary.Running a subsidiary company can be interesting, fun and extremely rewarding. In our increasingly globalized world, it's also a valuable resume builder.

September 6, 2016

What Does It Take To Run A Subsidiary?

In the last several years I’ve done a number of searches for presidents of the US subsidiaries of foreign companies. These jobs present several special challenges. In no particular order, here they are:

  • First, they require knowledge of how to work with people from different cultures. That doesn't necessarily mean prior experience working for a foreign company, though that usually helps. It could come from experience with family members (like if mom and dad are immigrants) or from living overseas.
  • Second, it requires top-tier communication skills. Communication is always critical, of course, but it's even more important when dealing with a home office that's thousands of miles and many time zones away, and where differences of language and culture can easily lead to misunderstandings.
  • Third, it requires flexibility. Sometimes the home office wants to do things a certain way because that's just the way they do it. Provided their approach works, you need to go with the flow. Save your energy for issues that really matter to the business.
  • Finally, it requires understanding the role and what you can and cannot change. Running a subsidiary means certain key decisions will be made at the home office. As president, you'll have input, but not final say. You need to be comfortable with that.

If this sounds good to you, consider opportunities to run a subsidiary.Running a subsidiary company can be interesting, fun and extremely rewarding. In our increasingly globalized world, it's also a valuable resume builder.

September 6, 2016

What Does It Take To Run A Subsidiary?

In the last several years I’ve done a number of searches for presidents of the US subsidiaries of foreign companies. These jobs present several special challenges. In no particular order, here they are:

  • First, they require knowledge of how to work with people from different cultures. That doesn't necessarily mean prior experience working for a foreign company, though that usually helps. It could come from experience with family members (like if mom and dad are immigrants) or from living overseas.
  • Second, it requires top-tier communication skills. Communication is always critical, of course, but it's even more important when dealing with a home office that's thousands of miles and many time zones away, and where differences of language and culture can easily lead to misunderstandings.
  • Third, it requires flexibility. Sometimes the home office wants to do things a certain way because that's just the way they do it. Provided their approach works, you need to go with the flow. Save your energy for issues that really matter to the business.
  • Finally, it requires understanding the role and what you can and cannot change. Running a subsidiary means certain key decisions will be made at the home office. As president, you'll have input, but not final say. You need to be comfortable with that.

If this sounds good to you, consider opportunities to run a subsidiary.Running a subsidiary company can be interesting, fun and extremely rewarding. In our increasingly globalized world, it's also a valuable resume builder.

September 6, 2016

What Does It Take To Run A Subsidiary?

In the last several years I’ve done a number of searches for presidents of the US subsidiaries of foreign companies. These jobs present several special challenges. In no particular order, here they are:

  • First, they require knowledge of how to work with people from different cultures. That doesn't necessarily mean prior experience working for a foreign company, though that usually helps. It could come from experience with family members (like if mom and dad are immigrants) or from living overseas.
  • Second, it requires top-tier communication skills. Communication is always critical, of course, but it's even more important when dealing with a home office that's thousands of miles and many time zones away, and where differences of language and culture can easily lead to misunderstandings.
  • Third, it requires flexibility. Sometimes the home office wants to do things a certain way because that's just the way they do it. Provided their approach works, you need to go with the flow. Save your energy for issues that really matter to the business.
  • Finally, it requires understanding the role and what you can and cannot change. Running a subsidiary means certain key decisions will be made at the home office. As president, you'll have input, but not final say. You need to be comfortable with that.

If this sounds good to you, consider opportunities to run a subsidiary.Running a subsidiary company can be interesting, fun and extremely rewarding. In our increasingly globalized world, it's also a valuable resume builder.

September 6, 2016

What Does It Take To Run A Subsidiary?

In the last several years I’ve done a number of searches for presidents of the US subsidiaries of foreign companies. These jobs present several special challenges. In no particular order, here they are:

  • First, they require knowledge of how to work with people from different cultures. That doesn't necessarily mean prior experience working for a foreign company, though that usually helps. It could come from experience with family members (like if mom and dad are immigrants) or from living overseas.
  • Second, it requires top-tier communication skills. Communication is always critical, of course, but it's even more important when dealing with a home office that's thousands of miles and many time zones away, and where differences of language and culture can easily lead to misunderstandings.
  • Third, it requires flexibility. Sometimes the home office wants to do things a certain way because that's just the way they do it. Provided their approach works, you need to go with the flow. Save your energy for issues that really matter to the business.
  • Finally, it requires understanding the role and what you can and cannot change. Running a subsidiary means certain key decisions will be made at the home office. As president, you'll have input, but not final say. You need to be comfortable with that.

If this sounds good to you, consider opportunities to run a subsidiary.Running a subsidiary company can be interesting, fun and extremely rewarding. In our increasingly globalized world, it's also a valuable resume builder.

September 6, 2016

What Does It Take To Run A Subsidiary?

In the last several years I’ve done a number of searches for presidents of the US subsidiaries of foreign companies. These jobs present several special challenges. In no particular order, here they are:

  • First, they require knowledge of how to work with people from different cultures. That doesn't necessarily mean prior experience working for a foreign company, though that usually helps. It could come from experience with family members (like if mom and dad are immigrants) or from living overseas.
  • Second, it requires top-tier communication skills. Communication is always critical, of course, but it's even more important when dealing with a home office that's thousands of miles and many time zones away, and where differences of language and culture can easily lead to misunderstandings.
  • Third, it requires flexibility. Sometimes the home office wants to do things a certain way because that's just the way they do it. Provided their approach works, you need to go with the flow. Save your energy for issues that really matter to the business.
  • Finally, it requires understanding the role and what you can and cannot change. Running a subsidiary means certain key decisions will be made at the home office. As president, you'll have input, but not final say. You need to be comfortable with that.

If this sounds good to you, consider opportunities to run a subsidiary.Running a subsidiary company can be interesting, fun and extremely rewarding. In our increasingly globalized world, it's also a valuable resume builder.

September 6, 2016

What Does It Take To Run A Subsidiary?

In the last several years I’ve done a number of searches for presidents of the US subsidiaries of foreign companies. These jobs present several special challenges. In no particular order, here they are:

  • First, they require knowledge of how to work with people from different cultures. That doesn't necessarily mean prior experience working for a foreign company, though that usually helps. It could come from experience with family members (like if mom and dad are immigrants) or from living overseas.
  • Second, it requires top-tier communication skills. Communication is always critical, of course, but it's even more important when dealing with a home office that's thousands of miles and many time zones away, and where differences of language and culture can easily lead to misunderstandings.
  • Third, it requires flexibility. Sometimes the home office wants to do things a certain way because that's just the way they do it. Provided their approach works, you need to go with the flow. Save your energy for issues that really matter to the business.
  • Finally, it requires understanding the role and what you can and cannot change. Running a subsidiary means certain key decisions will be made at the home office. As president, you'll have input, but not final say. You need to be comfortable with that.

If this sounds good to you, consider opportunities to run a subsidiary.Running a subsidiary company can be interesting, fun and extremely rewarding. In our increasingly globalized world, it's also a valuable resume builder.

September 6, 2016

What Does It Take To Run A Subsidiary?

In the last several years I’ve done a number of searches for presidents of the US subsidiaries of foreign companies. These jobs present several special challenges. In no particular order, here they are:

  • First, they require knowledge of how to work with people from different cultures. That doesn't necessarily mean prior experience working for a foreign company, though that usually helps. It could come from experience with family members (like if mom and dad are immigrants) or from living overseas.
  • Second, it requires top-tier communication skills. Communication is always critical, of course, but it's even more important when dealing with a home office that's thousands of miles and many time zones away, and where differences of language and culture can easily lead to misunderstandings.
  • Third, it requires flexibility. Sometimes the home office wants to do things a certain way because that's just the way they do it. Provided their approach works, you need to go with the flow. Save your energy for issues that really matter to the business.
  • Finally, it requires understanding the role and what you can and cannot change. Running a subsidiary means certain key decisions will be made at the home office. As president, you'll have input, but not final say. You need to be comfortable with that.

If this sounds good to you, consider opportunities to run a subsidiary.Running a subsidiary company can be interesting, fun and extremely rewarding. In our increasingly globalized world, it's also a valuable resume builder.

September 6, 2016

What Does It Take To Run A Subsidiary?

In the last several years I’ve done a number of searches for presidents of the US subsidiaries of foreign companies. These jobs present several special challenges. In no particular order, here they are:

  • First, they require knowledge of how to work with people from different cultures. That doesn't necessarily mean prior experience working for a foreign company, though that usually helps. It could come from experience with family members (like if mom and dad are immigrants) or from living overseas.
  • Second, it requires top-tier communication skills. Communication is always critical, of course, but it's even more important when dealing with a home office that's thousands of miles and many time zones away, and where differences of language and culture can easily lead to misunderstandings.
  • Third, it requires flexibility. Sometimes the home office wants to do things a certain way because that's just the way they do it. Provided their approach works, you need to go with the flow. Save your energy for issues that really matter to the business.
  • Finally, it requires understanding the role and what you can and cannot change. Running a subsidiary means certain key decisions will be made at the home office. As president, you'll have input, but not final say. You need to be comfortable with that.

If this sounds good to you, consider opportunities to run a subsidiary.Running a subsidiary company can be interesting, fun and extremely rewarding. In our increasingly globalized world, it's also a valuable resume builder.

September 6, 2016

What Does It Take To Run A Subsidiary?

In the last several years I’ve done a number of searches for presidents of the US subsidiaries of foreign companies. These jobs present several special challenges. In no particular order, here they are:

  • First, they require knowledge of how to work with people from different cultures. That doesn't necessarily mean prior experience working for a foreign company, though that usually helps. It could come from experience with family members (like if mom and dad are immigrants) or from living overseas.
  • Second, it requires top-tier communication skills. Communication is always critical, of course, but it's even more important when dealing with a home office that's thousands of miles and many time zones away, and where differences of language and culture can easily lead to misunderstandings.
  • Third, it requires flexibility. Sometimes the home office wants to do things a certain way because that's just the way they do it. Provided their approach works, you need to go with the flow. Save your energy for issues that really matter to the business.
  • Finally, it requires understanding the role and what you can and cannot change. Running a subsidiary means certain key decisions will be made at the home office. As president, you'll have input, but not final say. You need to be comfortable with that.

If this sounds good to you, consider opportunities to run a subsidiary.Running a subsidiary company can be interesting, fun and extremely rewarding. In our increasingly globalized world, it's also a valuable resume builder.

September 6, 2016

What Does It Take To Run A Subsidiary?

In the last several years I’ve done a number of searches for presidents of the US subsidiaries of foreign companies. These jobs present several special challenges. In no particular order, here they are:

  • First, they require knowledge of how to work with people from different cultures. That doesn't necessarily mean prior experience working for a foreign company, though that usually helps. It could come from experience with family members (like if mom and dad are immigrants) or from living overseas.
  • Second, it requires top-tier communication skills. Communication is always critical, of course, but it's even more important when dealing with a home office that's thousands of miles and many time zones away, and where differences of language and culture can easily lead to misunderstandings.
  • Third, it requires flexibility. Sometimes the home office wants to do things a certain way because that's just the way they do it. Provided their approach works, you need to go with the flow. Save your energy for issues that really matter to the business.
  • Finally, it requires understanding the role and what you can and cannot change. Running a subsidiary means certain key decisions will be made at the home office. As president, you'll have input, but not final say. You need to be comfortable with that.

If this sounds good to you, consider opportunities to run a subsidiary.Running a subsidiary company can be interesting, fun and extremely rewarding. In our increasingly globalized world, it's also a valuable resume builder.

September 6, 2016

What Does It Take To Run A Subsidiary?

In the last several years I’ve done a number of searches for presidents of the US subsidiaries of foreign companies. These jobs present several special challenges. In no particular order, here they are:

  • First, they require knowledge of how to work with people from different cultures. That doesn't necessarily mean prior experience working for a foreign company, though that usually helps. It could come from experience with family members (like if mom and dad are immigrants) or from living overseas.
  • Second, it requires top-tier communication skills. Communication is always critical, of course, but it's even more important when dealing with a home office that's thousands of miles and many time zones away, and where differences of language and culture can easily lead to misunderstandings.
  • Third, it requires flexibility. Sometimes the home office wants to do things a certain way because that's just the way they do it. Provided their approach works, you need to go with the flow. Save your energy for issues that really matter to the business.
  • Finally, it requires understanding the role and what you can and cannot change. Running a subsidiary means certain key decisions will be made at the home office. As president, you'll have input, but not final say. You need to be comfortable with that.

If this sounds good to you, consider opportunities to run a subsidiary.Running a subsidiary company can be interesting, fun and extremely rewarding. In our increasingly globalized world, it's also a valuable resume builder.

September 6, 2016

What Does It Take To Run A Subsidiary?

In the last several years I’ve done a number of searches for presidents of the US subsidiaries of foreign companies. These jobs present several special challenges. In no particular order, here they are:

  • First, they require knowledge of how to work with people from different cultures. That doesn't necessarily mean prior experience working for a foreign company, though that usually helps. It could come from experience with family members (like if mom and dad are immigrants) or from living overseas.
  • Second, it requires top-tier communication skills. Communication is always critical, of course, but it's even more important when dealing with a home office that's thousands of miles and many time zones away, and where differences of language and culture can easily lead to misunderstandings.
  • Third, it requires flexibility. Sometimes the home office wants to do things a certain way because that's just the way they do it. Provided their approach works, you need to go with the flow. Save your energy for issues that really matter to the business.
  • Finally, it requires understanding the role and what you can and cannot change. Running a subsidiary means certain key decisions will be made at the home office. As president, you'll have input, but not final say. You need to be comfortable with that.

If this sounds good to you, consider opportunities to run a subsidiary.Running a subsidiary company can be interesting, fun and extremely rewarding. In our increasingly globalized world, it's also a valuable resume builder.

September 6, 2016

What Does It Take To Run A Subsidiary?

In the last several years I’ve done a number of searches for presidents of the US subsidiaries of foreign companies. These jobs present several special challenges. In no particular order, here they are:

  • First, they require knowledge of how to work with people from different cultures. That doesn't necessarily mean prior experience working for a foreign company, though that usually helps. It could come from experience with family members (like if mom and dad are immigrants) or from living overseas.
  • Second, it requires top-tier communication skills. Communication is always critical, of course, but it's even more important when dealing with a home office that's thousands of miles and many time zones away, and where differences of language and culture can easily lead to misunderstandings.
  • Third, it requires flexibility. Sometimes the home office wants to do things a certain way because that's just the way they do it. Provided their approach works, you need to go with the flow. Save your energy for issues that really matter to the business.
  • Finally, it requires understanding the role and what you can and cannot change. Running a subsidiary means certain key decisions will be made at the home office. As president, you'll have input, but not final say. You need to be comfortable with that.

If this sounds good to you, consider opportunities to run a subsidiary.Running a subsidiary company can be interesting, fun and extremely rewarding. In our increasingly globalized world, it's also a valuable resume builder.

September 6, 2016

What Does It Take To Run A Subsidiary?

In the last several years I’ve done a number of searches for presidents of the US subsidiaries of foreign companies. These jobs present several special challenges. In no particular order, here they are:

  • First, they require knowledge of how to work with people from different cultures. That doesn't necessarily mean prior experience working for a foreign company, though that usually helps. It could come from experience with family members (like if mom and dad are immigrants) or from living overseas.
  • Second, it requires top-tier communication skills. Communication is always critical, of course, but it's even more important when dealing with a home office that's thousands of miles and many time zones away, and where differences of language and culture can easily lead to misunderstandings.
  • Third, it requires flexibility. Sometimes the home office wants to do things a certain way because that's just the way they do it. Provided their approach works, you need to go with the flow. Save your energy for issues that really matter to the business.
  • Finally, it requires understanding the role and what you can and cannot change. Running a subsidiary means certain key decisions will be made at the home office. As president, you'll have input, but not final say. You need to be comfortable with that.

If this sounds good to you, consider opportunities to run a subsidiary.Running a subsidiary company can be interesting, fun and extremely rewarding. In our increasingly globalized world, it's also a valuable resume builder.

September 6, 2016

What Does It Take To Run A Subsidiary?

In the last several years I’ve done a number of searches for presidents of the US subsidiaries of foreign companies. These jobs present several special challenges. In no particular order, here they are:

  • First, they require knowledge of how to work with people from different cultures. That doesn't necessarily mean prior experience working for a foreign company, though that usually helps. It could come from experience with family members (like if mom and dad are immigrants) or from living overseas.
  • Second, it requires top-tier communication skills. Communication is always critical, of course, but it's even more important when dealing with a home office that's thousands of miles and many time zones away, and where differences of language and culture can easily lead to misunderstandings.
  • Third, it requires flexibility. Sometimes the home office wants to do things a certain way because that's just the way they do it. Provided their approach works, you need to go with the flow. Save your energy for issues that really matter to the business.
  • Finally, it requires understanding the role and what you can and cannot change. Running a subsidiary means certain key decisions will be made at the home office. As president, you'll have input, but not final say. You need to be comfortable with that.

If this sounds good to you, consider opportunities to run a subsidiary.Running a subsidiary company can be interesting, fun and extremely rewarding. In our increasingly globalized world, it's also a valuable resume builder.

September 6, 2016

What Does It Take To Run A Subsidiary?

In the last several years I’ve done a number of searches for presidents of the US subsidiaries of foreign companies. These jobs present several special challenges. In no particular order, here they are:

  • First, they require knowledge of how to work with people from different cultures. That doesn't necessarily mean prior experience working for a foreign company, though that usually helps. It could come from experience with family members (like if mom and dad are immigrants) or from living overseas.
  • Second, it requires top-tier communication skills. Communication is always critical, of course, but it's even more important when dealing with a home office that's thousands of miles and many time zones away, and where differences of language and culture can easily lead to misunderstandings.
  • Third, it requires flexibility. Sometimes the home office wants to do things a certain way because that's just the way they do it. Provided their approach works, you need to go with the flow. Save your energy for issues that really matter to the business.
  • Finally, it requires understanding the role and what you can and cannot change. Running a subsidiary means certain key decisions will be made at the home office. As president, you'll have input, but not final say. You need to be comfortable with that.

If this sounds good to you, consider opportunities to run a subsidiary.Running a subsidiary company can be interesting, fun and extremely rewarding. In our increasingly globalized world, it's also a valuable resume builder.

Words
of Praise

Mike does a very good job of listening. He understands ZOLL, and that allows him to figure out who’s going to thrive in our organization.

— Richard Packer, Chairman, ZOLL Medical Corporation